History of Terror, Zulu Terror, The Mfecane Holocaust, 1815-1840

This book expands the very interesting History of Terror series. There is much to learn about the history of Africa and this book exposes the wars within the Zulu peoples and with the Boers who had moved into the interior to escape British rule. – Very Highly Recommended

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NAME: History of Terror, Zulu Terror, The Mfecane Holocaust, 1815-1840
FILE: R2848
AUTHOR: Robin Binckes
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: soft back 
PAGES: 128
PRICE: £12.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Africa, South Africa, Cape Colony, Transvaal, Orange Free State, 
Dutch colonists, Boers, Zulu, Matabele, internecine warfare, British expansion

ISBN: 1-52672-889-3

IMAGE: B2848.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/yyrm3bc5
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION:   This book expands the very interesting History of Terror 
series. There is much to learn about the history of Africa and this book exposes 
the wars within the Zulu peoples and with the Boers who had moved into the 
interior to escape British rule. – Very Highly Recommended

The history of Africa is remarkably unknown. Historians have concentrated on parts 
of the colonial expansion by European powers in the late 19th Century, but very little 
has been written about Africa before the arrival of the Europeans or the early trading 
centres and colonies. Britain came relatively late to Africa. The early European 
colonists were Portuguese and Dutch following on from the earlier Arab 
colonization and exploitation. The slave trade was built on Arab and African 
slavers, bt Europeans bought slaves from these slave traders for transportation to 
the sugar and cotton plantations of the West Indies and America.

Britain began its dash for Empire during the Napoleonic Wars and seized Cape 
Colony from the Dutch. From that point, British interests expanded North and 
along the West and East Coasts. Encouraged by British colonial power, France, 
Belgium and Germany decided to enter the race and the African map became 
covered with a patchwork of colours representing these European Powers, with 
Britain taking the lion share of territory. In the process, natural tribal groupings 
were ignored and new colonies became new nations with a broad racial mix and 
tensions. The result has been that histories and recent journalism has paid scant 
attention to the first half of the 19th Century and the very rapid process of change.

The author has examined the bloody period when the Zulu nation began to fragment 
and contend with the Boer trekkers who drove into the interior with their wagon 
trains in their escape from British control around Cape Town. This was a turbulent 
and devastating period of African history. The Zulu had been the Prussians of 
Africa and their large and well-drilled armies had defeated generations of opposition 
from neighbouring tribes. When the Zulu nation divided into two warring camps 
under King Shaka and the rebel chief Mzililkazi the rebels formed a new tribal 
grouping, the Matabele, and made Zimbabwe their centre. The Boers became 
enemy and ally between the two groups and the conflict came to its head in the 
Battle of Blood River between Dingane's 20,000 strong Zulu Army and the Boer 
Voortrekkers, establishing the Boer lands and setting the scene for the wars between 
the Zulus and the British, and the two wars between the Boers and the British that 
led to the new state of South Africa with its internal divides.