History of British European Airways, 1946-1972

b2401
Lavishly illustrated with rare photographs, including full colour, 
this book charts the history of British civil aviation from the end 
of WWII until the merger of BEA and BOAC to form British Airways. 
Considering the number of civil aircraft flying since 1945, it is 
surprising that more books have not been published on their service. 
The author provides a very welcome and well-researched account of BEA, 
and its aircraft, which is a pleasure to read.

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NAME: History of British European Airways, 1946-1972
FILE: R2401
AUTHOR:  Charles Woodley
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: soft back 
PAGES:  206
PRICE: £14.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: civil aircraft, air liners, European air routes, post-World War 
II, DC3, Avro Viking, Rapide, Viscount, Comet, Trident. BAC-111, BOAC, 
BA, British Airways
IMAGE: B2401.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/hgpy3av
LINKS: Current Discount Offers http://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/sale 
DESCRIPTION: Lavishly illustrated with rare photographs, including 
full colour, this book charts the history of British civil aviation 
from the end of WWII until the merger of BEA and BOAC to form British 
Airways. Considering the number of civil aircraft flying since 1945, 
it is surprising that more books have not been published on their 
service. The author provides a very welcome and well-researched 
account of BEA, and its aircraft, which is a pleasure to read.

In 1946, Britain had to restart its civil aviation manufacture and 
airlines. It was a grim time, with the post-war Labour Government 
determined to squander funds on propping up the currency and 
nationalising anything that moved, and a lot of things that didn't. 
The new nationalised industries suffered from central control and 
many would have prospered better as private industries, but aviation 
was perhaps an exception because of the huge sums of money required 
to buy new aircraft and re-establish an industry that had been 
subordinated to the war effort.

1946 may have presented a great many challenges, but the opportunities 
for airlines were considerable. By establishing BEA as a domestic and 
European service network, and BOAC as the long-haul national airline, 
there were initially strong benefits, even though BA would be 
eventually created by amalgamating the two airlines to gain the 
benefits of scale.

The author has reviewed the earlier civil air operations from the UK 
to Europe using Croydon and Northolt, setting the scene for his 
formidable review of BEA. He has provided a full fleet list and 
explained the evolving structure of engineering bases, terminals, 
European and domestic services, cargo services and helicopter 
operations.

Many readers will be surprised by the range of aircraft and the 
experiments in operating helicopters. The earlier years included 
operating ex-Luftwaffe Ju52 tri motor military transports, Mosquito 
warplanes and the biplane Rapide. This is a comprehensive review and 
it is difficult to think of anything that might have been missed.