Heathrow Airport, Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow

A very nicely presented history of one of the greatest airports in the world, its challenges and its prospects. The author has provided a comprehensive history of London Heathrow which is also a history of post-war air transport development – Highly Recommended

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NAME: Heathrow Airport, Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow
FILE: R2977
AUTHOR: Alan Gallop
PUBLISHER: Pen and Sword
BINDING: hard back
PAGES: 257
PRICE: £25.oo
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, post war air travel, commercial airliners, scheduled flights, mass 
transit airports, national airport, major airports, 1st London Airport, Heathrow, West 
Drayton, international air-hub, pollution, controversy, expansion, development of air 
travel, BAOC, BEA, British Airways, premium air travel, Concorde, national carriers

ISBN: 1-52675-918-7

IMAGE: B2977.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/y3lzs8gr
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: A very nicely presented history of one of the greatest airports in the 
world, its challenges and its prospects. The author has provided a comprehensive 
history of London Heathrow which is also a history of post-war air transport 
development –   Highly Recommended

The author offers a well researched and written history of one of the most important 
airports in the world, considering the challenges met and overcome, the opportunities 
and constraints for the future. From a muddy airfield, with some very primitive 
accommodation and a collection of converted bombers, new aircraft, derived from 
bombers, and the first attempts at producing next generation airliners and freight 
aircraft, London Heathrow has grown into one of the largest and most important 
modern airports in the world. This has not been without its problems and 
controversies which linger on.

Britain is a natural hub on the edge of Europe for business and for air travel. Even 
attempts by the European Union to move power, funds and influence out of Britain, 
have failed to move the hub to France or Germany. With Great Britain due to emerge 
once more as a proud, dynamic, prosperous sovereign State, the pressures on 
Heathrow and the other London airports will increase dramatically. This analysis of 
Heathrow's history and prospects is a very useful guide to the pressures that will also 
apply to other British airports that may again host supersonic passenger 
transportation. It is also a charming and absorbing account that is supported by many 
photographs and a very attractive colour plate section with photographs and 
reproductions of posters and paintings from the past.

For Centuries, London has been the major financial and commercial hub for the 
World. At each stage in history it has adapted, expanded and embraced new 
technologies. Many of the most important phrases in trade and transport contracts 
have been written by the major London law firms. The advent of the aircraft 
therefore required London to add an air-hub, initially at Croydon, for pre-WWII 
commercial air transport with Imperial Airways providing services to most corners 
of the Globe. The basic challenge was that a London Airport had to be close enough 
to the City of London to make travel into London attractive, or at least acceptable, 
but be far enough outside to minimise the inconvenience of aircraft noise and safety 
issues. It is a challenge that every capital city faces in every country and a challenge 
that is met without satisfying every vested interest.

Heathrow was almost an accidental selection but it was in an area where its impact 
was just about acceptable. Today, a continuous bead chain of large jet airliners runs 
closely over a heavily populated area at almost rooftop height in the final approach, 
with a similar densely filled chain taking off. This operation continues through 24 
hours everyday with little relief. As the density of movements reaches saturation 
point there are only two options. One is to add a further runway and terminal 
buildings at Heathrow, and the alternative is to build or expand another London 
Airport. Inevitably, space for new airports is scare in an overcrowded island and 
brings the inconvenience and damage of heavy air movements to previously 
unspoilt locations. It also requires new road and rail infrastructure to ensure the 
travel times into and out of London are acceptable to travellers. It is essentially a 
set of requirements that are incompatible and solutions become decisions that 
generate the lowest level of distress, inconvenience and anxiety. Usually it means 
that no one is really happy with the result.

The author answers many questions, provides new insight and provides an 
interesting and entertaining book.