Gurkha Odyssey, Campaigning For The Crown

To the British public, amongst the most respected and best loved British regiments and soldiers are the Gurkhas. The author has campaigned with the Gurkha soldier, trekked through their hill villages and fought for them in the corridors of Whitehall. – Most Highly Recommended.

http://reviews.firetrench.com

http://adn.firetrench.com

http://bgn.firetrench.com

http://nthn.firetrench.com

http://ftnews.firetrench.com

NAME: Gurkha Odyssey, Campaigning For The Crown
FILE: R3109
AUTHOR: Peter Duffell
PUBLISHER: Pen and Sword
BINDING: hard back
PRICE: £25.00                                                               
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Honourable East India Company, Bengal Army, British Army Gurkha 
Regiments, recruitment, WWI, WWII, North West Frontier, Cold War, hill villages, 
Nepal

ISBN: 1-52673-057-X

PAGES: 290
IMAGE: B3109.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/r2ok4wy
DESCRIPTION: To the British public, amongst the most respected and best loved 
British regiments and soldiers are the Gurkhas. The author has campaigned with 
the Gurkha soldier, trekked through their hill villages and fought for them in the 
corridors of Whitehall. –  Most Highly Recommended.

Lieutenant General Sir Peter Duffell has taken a compelling journey through Gurkha 
history that also includes his own march. He has portrayed the unique style and 
character of these exceptional warriors who have served Britain so well down the 
generations.

The Gurkhas fought against the Honourable East India Company in 1814 and their 
ability impressed greatly. At the end of hostility, the East India Company began 
recruiting Gurkhas into their Bengal Army, starting a tradition that has endured since. 
When the excesses of the East India Company led to its fall from grace Horse Guards 
was required to send British soldiers out to replace Company troops but also found 
the Gurkhas to be exemplary warriors and recruited them. Since then the Gurkhas 
have served on the North West Frontier, through two world wars and a series of 
smaller conflicts since, campaigning for the crown.

The pay and pensions, though modest have allowed Gurkhas to return to the hill 
country of Nepal in some comfort and to the benefit of their communities at the end 
of their service. Consequently, there is strong competition during the recruitment to 
secure a place in the British Army and now also in the Indian Army. They are often 
described as light-hearted and gallant, a rare combination and they have been taken to 
the British heart although not without some skirmishing on their behalf in the 
corridors of Whitehall. Their contribution to the British Army and the Crown have 
been significant, deserving equal loyalty in return, in the form of good pay and 
conditions during service and a solid pension at the end of service. Politicians do not 
have a good record of maintaining the Compact to look after British troops and this 
has extended to the Gurkhas. Although many Gurkhas return to their hills at the end 
of the service a number hope to remain in Britain where they have made friends and 
this should be an automatic right for every Gurkha who retires with good conduct.

Long may they campaign for the Crown.

Jai Mahakali Ayo Gurkhali!