Gottstrafe England! The Zeppelin Offensive, A German Perspective In Pictures & Postcards

A wealth of images, many in full colour, from the time providing a German perspective. This is the story of the first air war in history, including not only German artwork but also British counterparts, with good supporting text. – Highly Recommended.

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NAME: Gottstrafe England! The Zeppelin Offensive, A German Perspective In 
Pictures & Postcards
FILE: R3076
AUTHOR: David Marks
PUBLISHER: Pen and Sword, Air World
BINDING: soft back
PRICE: £14.99                                                               
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWI, World War I, World War 1, First World War, The Great War, air 
raids, rigid airships, Zeppelins,air war, postcards, artwork, pictures, terror raids, 
Home Front

ISBN: 1-52673-719-1

PAGES: 98
IMAGE: B3076.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/yhxyjthq
LINKS: 
DESCRIPTION: A wealth of images, many in full colour, from the time providing a 
German perspective. This is the story of the first air war in history, including not 
only German artwork but also British counterparts, with good supporting text. –  
Highly Recommended.

An original coverage of the first bombing campaign is history which changed the 
nature of war. Before World War One, military forces had to fight through military 
defences to reach the civil population, resulting in the conflict being largely confined 
to combatants and with much of the enemy civilian population seeing no military 
threats. In 1914, the Zeppelins allowed the Germans to terror bomb civilian targets 
across Britain with little opposition, leading immediately to total war where civilian 
and military personnel were equally at risk.

The basis of this book is the artwork from the time and conveys the official 
perspectives, with individual perspectives. Over all, the German raids were probably 
counter-productive. Initially, British towns and cities were almost completely 
unprotected. That soon began to change as anti-aircraft guns were installed and fighter 
aircraft developed to reach the airships and hit them with effective weapons. As the 
balance changed, the Germans began to switch over to heavier than air machines 
which were smaller targets for defenders, but the damage done by bombing was more 
than compensated by the civil and military populations coming together in a way not 
experienced before. It assisted recruitment of women to war work and made the 
whole population feel that it was fighting the enemy as courageously as the men in 
the trenches.

This book is a visual treat and, in addition to appealing the aviation history 
enthusiasts, it will appeal to all those interested in how artwork was harnessed to 
convey information in time of war.