General Sir Ralph Abercromby and the French Revolutionary Wars, 1792-1801

The French Revolutionary Wars are far less well known than the Napoleonic Wars, the Generals of these earlier wars being equally less well known. The author presents a perceptive study of the French Revolutionary Wars and a British General who was probably robbed of deserved notability as he died in his moment of triumph. – Much Recommended

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NAME: General Sir Ralph Abercromby and the French Revolutionary Wars, 1792-
1801
FILE: R2818
AUTHOR: Carole Divall
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back 
PAGES: 336
PRICE: £25.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: French Revolutionary Wars, British Expeditionary Forces, Europe, 
Caribbean, Egypt, sea power, empire colonies

ISBN: 1-52674-146-6

IMAGE: B2818.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/yy2ct957
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION:   The French Revolutionary Wars are far less well known than 
the Napoleonic Wars, the Generals of these earlier wars being equally less well 
known. The author presents a perceptive study of the French Revolutionary 
Wars and a British General who was probably robbed of deserved notability as 
he died in his moment of triumph. -  Much Recommended

The British have always had a desire to avoid maintaining large standing armies. A modest standing 
army is expanded with urgency as a new war errupts. This usually means that the first battles go against 
Britain as adequate resources are prepared and generals adapt to the new requirements of the latest war. 
This was the experience in many wars through history and none more so than the French Revolutionary 
Wars.

What has always saved Britain, and given it the time to prepare for victory, is an effective Royal Navy 
that has time after time demonstrated its ability to achieve naval superiority. As Britain's overseas 
interests grew, the Royal Navy also provided the means to carry soldiers and the equipment of armies 
around the world to the furthest parts of the globe. This meant that expeditionary forces could be landed 
in Europe to fight in the Low Countries together with allies. This was further aided by British gold and 
supplies. It also meant that the first engagements there tended to be unproductive and this was the 
experience for General Abercromby in the Low Countries in 1793-5 and again in 1799 at Den Helder. 
His actions outside Europe were a different story.

Abercomby achieved some solid success in the Caribbean and major success in Egypt. He was one of 
those few generals who was loved by his troops and respected by his contemporaries. He knew how to 
rally a demoralized army who could lead and support his soldiers. Like Nelson, Abercromby  was killed 
in his moment of victory, but unlike Nelson, he was followed by a new rising star, Wellington, who 
fought through the Iberian Campaigns and invaded France, otherwise, Abercromby might have been as 
famous today as Nelson.

This is an absorbing review of a major military figure in the British forces. There is also a fascinating black 
and white photo-plate section that supports the able text.