From Warsaw to Rome, General Anders’ Exiled Polish Army in the Second World War

The story of the Polish II Corps has never been adequately told before but the author has followed the story from the invasion of Poland by Russia and Germany, the imprisonment of Polish soldiers by the Soviets, the efforts by the Allies free them when the Soviets were invaded by Hitler, their service in Italy and the neglect of their interests at the end of the war. – Highly Recommended.


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NAME: From Warsaw to Rome, General Anders' Exiled Polish Army in the 
Second World War
FILE: R2566
AUTHOR: Martin Williams
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back
PAGES:  276
PRICE: £25.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, World War 2, World War II, Second World War, armour, 
tanks, AFV, Armoured Fighting Vehicles, gun tank, flak tank, assault 
gun, mortar, infantry, Warsaw, Russian prisoners, North Africa, 
Italy, post-war neglect

ISBN: 1-47389-488-3

IMAGE: B256gjpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/yc84wtes
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: The story of the Polish II Corps has never been 
adequately told before but the author has followed the story from 
the invasion of Poland by Russia and Germany, the imprisonment of 
Polish soldiers by the Soviets, the efforts by the Allies free them 
when the Soviets were invaded by Hitler, their service in Italy and 
the neglect of their interests at the end of the war.  -  Highly 
Recommended.

When Britain declared war on Germany, to honour its commitment to 
defend Poland, it was to some extent gesture politics. Britain and 
France were without the resources to send an army into Poland before 
its collapse. Some politicians hoped the declaration of war would 
shake the Germans sufficiently to encourage their retreat back over 
the German border, followed by a peace treaty and the end of the 
possibility of war. Only the most ardent appeasers really believed 
that was realistic. The Phony War inevitably followed the German and 
Russian occupation of Poland, to be followed in turn by a German 
attack on the neutral Low Countries, invasion of France and 
evacuation of the BEF back to Britain.

A number of Polish soldiers, sailors and airmen managed to escape and 
find their way to Britain, but most became prisoners of war. Those 
falling into Soviet hands faired worst. The Soviets murdered most of 
the Polish officers in their custody and treated the other POWs badly. 
Then, the German invasion of Russia forced the Soviets to become 
allies of Britain, France and the US. That opened the way for the 
Allies to demand the Soviets release all Polish POWs. It resulted in 
the exiled Polish Army as it had survived Soviet captivity being 
evacuated en masse over the border into Iran, where they would be 
subsequently incorporated into the British Army.

Formed as the Polish II Corps within the British Army under the 
command of General Anders, the Poles proved to be tenacious and loyal 
allies, fighting their way up Italy. Their service is detailed in 
this book, making the most complete account of their history from 
Warsaw to Rome.

After WWII, the Poles should have been supported fully by the 
British. Sadly, lack of planning and incompetence led to a shameful 
fate. They were not alone amongst allies and POWs from central and 
Eastern Europe. Partly this was a result of the overwhelming task of 
sorting out the wreckage of war and the massive migration of people 
around Europe. Partly it was a failure to see Stalin for what he was, 
an even more blood spattered despot than Hitler. Uncomfortable 
reading but necessary