French Armoured Cruisers 1887-1932

A successful partnership of two leading maritime history authors looks at the development and deployment of French armoured cruisers 1887-1932. Careful research, well-written, and impeccably illustrated this is another definitive maritime history from the leading publishers in their field – Most Highly Recommended.

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NAME: French Armoured Cruisers 1887-1932
FILE: R3017
AUTHOR: John Jordan, Philippe Caresse
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword, Seaforth Publishing
BINDING: hard back
PRICE: £40.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWI, World War I, World War 1, World War One, The Great War, WWII, 
World War II, World War 2, World War Two, Second World War, naval; warfare, war 
at sea, cruisers, armoured cruisers, French cruisers, technology, tactics, crews

ISBN: 978-1-5267-4118-9

IMAGE: B3017.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/y6fguwp9
LINKS: 
DESCRIPTION: A successful partnership of two leading maritime history authors 
looks at the development and deployment of French armoured cruisers 1887-1932. 
Careful research, well-written, and impeccably illustrated this is another 
definitive maritime history from the leading publishers in their field  –  Most 
Highly Recommended.

The move from wood to steel, the inclusion of armour and the introduction of steam 
power produced an incredible increase in the potency of all classes of warship. The 
mounting of guns of a single main calibre in turrets, and the introduction of greatly 
improved ranging and direction systems made these ships formidable. The battleships 
and battlecruisers formed a clear class structure, line of battleships as the heart of 
fleets for formal fleet actions. They could be deployed for other purposes but there 
was a need in most navies for smaller but powerful vessels that followed the traditions 
of the wooden frigates.

The cruiser is a versatile warship that can be employed to protect sea routes, operate 
independently, and also participate in fleet actions, usually as a reconnaissance screen 
ahead of the main fleet. However, cruisers, as a class, cover a wide range of sizes and 
potency. The light cruisers were often little bigger than destroyers and armed with 
similar guns. Heavy cruisers went to the other extreme, being almost as large as a 
battleship, with powerful guns mid way between the battleship and light cruiser in 
calibre. As a result, the heavy cruiser could be heavily armoured and able to out-gun 
most warships, while having the ability to out-run warships with larger guns. This 
made them very useful for commerce raiding.

The French armoured cruisers posed a serious potential threat to the Royal Navy 
because their good speed, powerful armament and armour protection could allow 
them to be used individually or in small squadrons to cut the long British sea routes 
connecting Empire.

The authors have provided what is likely to remain the definitive work reviewing the 
French amoured cruiser from the revolutionary Dupuy-de-Lome of the 1880s through 
to the impressive six-funnelled Edgar Quinet. As with other Seaforth books, the very 
high standard of illustration will be very hard for any other publisher to match. This 
is the most comprehensive history to be published in English or French and will be 
much sought by enthusiasts, professionals and maritime historians.