Following in the Footsteps Of, Oliver Cromwell, a Historical Guide To The Civil War

Oliver Cromwell and Charles I are probably the best known characters of the English Civil War. The author has provided a very engaging account of the life and times of Oliver Cromwell, supported by illustration in a photo-plate section – Very Highly Recommended

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Oliver Cromwell and Charles I are probably the best known characters of the English Civil War. The author has provided a very engaging account of the life and times of Oliver Cromwell, supported by illustration in a photo-plate section – Very Highly Recommended

The British probably think of it as the Civil War, but it is also known as the English 
Civil War and the British Civil War. All somewhat confusing to many looking at it for 
the first time. It was essentially a struggle between a monarch, who believed in the 
Divine Right of Kings, and a Parliament that was starting to flex its muscles. As only 
the Union of Crowns had taken place, when James VI of Scotland also became 
James I of England, the Parliament was strictly an English Parliament and the the 
battles of the Civil War were fought across England, but principally in the Midlands, 
making it primarily an affair of the English. However, its outcome affected Scotland, 
Wales and Ireland, not least because it marked the change to a true Constitutional 
Monarchy. Ireland also suffered the largest number of casualties as a result not so 
much of battles, but of attrocities by both sides. There were sea battles around the 
British coast and engagements related to the Civil War

Cromwell was born in 1599 and died in 1658, although he continued past death in 
the desecration of his body by opponents and the continuing debate over his legacy. 
He was from a respectable but unimportant family with more powerful relatives. 
The Civil War brought him from obscurity as a modest country squire to a national 
figure and a prime mover in the conclusion of the Civil War with the Commonwealth 
under his command replacing the Monarchy until his death. Succeeded by his 
reluctant son, Cromwell's Commonwealth rapidly reverted to a Monarchy when the 
exiled son of Charles I was invited to return as Constitutional Monarch Charles II.

Cromwell was a principle commander of the Parliamentarian Army with a string of 
controversial victories that transformed him into the most powerful man in Britain. 
His Commonwealth saw many excesses, notably the bloody slaughter in Ireland, and 
his power base was narrow with many enemies. The author has painted an absorbing 
picture of Cromwell that is an excellent introduction to the Civil War and its 
consequences for those starting out with a developing interest in the subjects.