Flight Craft 21, Douglas DC-3

A great addition to the highly popular Flight Craft Series. This book reviews the history of an icon of both civil and military aviation Very Highly Recommended

NAME:  Flight Craft 21, Douglas DC-3
FILE: R3350
AUTHOR: Robert Jackson
PUBLISHER: Pen and Sword
BINDING: soft back
PRICE: £16.99                                                
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT:   Second World War, World War II, WWII, World War Two, World 
War 2, passenger transport, freight transport, military air transport, pre-war civil 
aviation, post war civil aviation, airliner, operation from rough ground, freight 
capacity, two engine monoplane

ISBN: 1-52675-998-5

PAGES: 84,  A wealth of illustration throughout the book in both full colour and 
B&W images. Most of the images are uniquely shot to illustrate this book, and 
coloured drawn have been commissioned specially for the book.
IMAGE: B3350.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/3wj6tfnx
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DESCRIPTION: A great addition to the highly popular Flight Craft Series. This 
book reviews the history of an icon of both civil and military aviation  Very 
Highly Recommended

This book features a high photographic content. As with sister volumes in the Flight Craft series most of the photographs have been shot specifically to illustrate the book and are of the highest quality in full colour. The clear text begins by providing an outline of the history of this important aircraft, continuing with a master class in building, from the many model kits available, to exhibition standard.

The DC-3/C-47 was one of the most important and recognized aircraft in aviation history. It revolutionized civil aviation before WWII and was a major battle-winning design in war. Afterwards, it soldiered on for decades and was particularly suitable to operation from bush airfields. This reviewer will always remember one DC-3 he flew in during the 1980s in Africa. The airstrip was primitive and the first job was to clear the elephants and other wild life off the airstrip while the co-pilot hand pumped fuel from 40 gal drums to top up the tanks. The boarding stairs were a wooden orange box and the in-flight communication was in the form of a hand written note by the pilot describing the flight plan, passed around by the single air hostess. A later flight in Alaska was similar, but with very different wild life, and equally memorable.