Flight Craft 16, Hawker Hunter, in British Service

The Hunter was the last trans-sonic British jet fighter with a long service life and a successful export record. This new addition to the very popular Fight Craft series provides a host of magnificent specially commissioned full colour drawings and a great selection of photographic images, many never before published. – Most Highly Recommended

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NAME: Flight Craft 16, Hawker Hunter, in British Service
FILE: R2830
AUTHOR: Martin Derry, Neil Robinson
PUBLISHER: Pen and Sword
BINDING: soft back 
PAGES: 96
PRICE: £16.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: single seat fighter, two seat trainer/fighter, Cold War, FAA, RAF, British 
service

ISBN: 1-52674-249-7

IMAGE: B2830.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/y3ct7sbn
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION:   The Hunter was the last trans-sonic British jet fighter with a 
long service life and a successful export record. This new addition to the very 
popular Fight Craft series provides a host of magnificent specially commissioned 
full colour drawings and a great selection of photographic images, many never 
before published. -  Most Highly Recommended

The Flight Craft series is specifically aimed at model makers and this new addition includes a section 
of specific models made from available kits, together with some enhancements that are available to 
those kits. However, this volume has good text and a wealth of illustration that is outstanding, making 
it a great buy for anyone with any level of interest in this popular and long lived aircraft.

When the Hunter entered service, it was a major step up for the RAF. It was designed from the start for 
swept wings. It was an unashamed pilot's aeroplane, It looked good and it was good, making it also a 
very successful export product. When the Black Arrows formed for a display season, it was spectacular 
and anyone lucky enough to see it displayed by the team will remember it as the outstanding display 
aircraft. Even though the Red Arrows later formed on the diminutive Folland Gnat and then transitioned 
to their current Hawk trainers' to become one of the leading display teams in the World, the Black 
Arrows were spectacular.

However, the Hunter faced a few challenges as it was introduced. There is a continuing debate about 
the decision to arm British fighters with four 30mm canon. The RAF view at the time was that the 
20mm canon was not adequate to deal with potential Soviet massed bomber formations. Some have 
suggested that aircraft, including the Hunter, should have had four or six 20mm guns. Whether this 
would have been adequate in a major threat scenario will never be known, but it would certainly have 
saved a lot of effort in early development. Equally, Hunters could have carried unguided missiles to 
ripple of salvo fire as was the intention for many other fighters of the period in combating mass nuclear 
bomber formations. The Hunter was transonic and this introduced some new unknowns. The 30mm 
canon provided some real challenges and the first aircraft suffered damage from empty shell cases 
being ejected. The solution was to be shell case collectors as bulges under the forward fuselage. There 
were also other challenges and the Hunter proved very adaptable with a huge number of modifications 
through its working life, including some local modification at squadron level.

Pilots loved the Hunter as a responsive aircraft with high performance, but still a very stable gun
 platform. It went to war at Suez and was used extensively by the RAF. The Royal Navy decided to 
adopt the Hunter as training aid to accustom the Fleet to attack by modern jet aircraft and it 
continued on in that role with great success.

Today, the RAF has some very effective aircraft but in very much smaller numbers than in the prime 
days of the Hunter. Low observability has also encouraged very muted colours. This is graphically 
demonstrated by the large number of specially commissioned full colour side views of the Hunter, 
with 16 pages of profile and 2-views.

A beautiful aircraft, long may it continue to fly.