Eyewitness Korea, The Experience of British & American Soldiers in the Korean War, 1950-1953

Histories and eyewitness accounts of the Korean War are remarkably rare, making this book an important addition to the available knowledge. Excellent research and presentation of the memoirs of those who were there Very Highly Recommended

NAME:  Eyewitness Korea, The Experience of British & American Soldiers in the 
Korean War, 1950-1953
FILE: R3362
AUTHOR: James Goulty
PUBLISHER: Pen and Sword
BINDING: hard back
PRICE: £25.00                                              
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT:   Korean War, China, USSR, Soviets, Cold War, US, Britain, UN, 
United Nations Forces, POWs, recruitment, training, casualties, armour, wave attacks,
 amphibious landings, morale, multi-national force
 
ISBN: 1-47387-090-9

PAGES: 259,  16 pages of B&W images in a photo-plate section 
IMAGE: B3362.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/4f8p9kk6
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: Histories and eyewitness accounts of the Korean War are 
remarkably rare, making this book an important addition to the available knowledge. 
Excellent research and presentation of the memoirs of those who were there  
Very Highly Recommended

The story of the Korean War was not well-reported at the time and has received far less attention of historians and enthusiasts than should be expected. In many respects the Korean War was as important as WWII. It was largely fought with weapons of that previous war, by soldiers trained in much the same way. It also depended on the knowledge built by the British and Americans in amphibious warfare that allowed a recovery from the near fatal ‘bug-out’ of American soldiers as the North Koreans swept south at the start of the war. It also followed some of the pattern of WWII. Initially, the Communists swept all before them and looked to be the certain winners but they were simply not fast enough. The US managed to obtain support from the newly formed United Nations, turning it into a UN Army. Equipment was shipped into the area and the skills, of island hopping and of the landings in North Africa, Sicily, Italy and Normandy, during WWII, were applied to hit the invaders where they least expected it and with a considerable force.

By the time of the ceasefire, the UN Force was dominant and left the Communists nowhere to go. They did refuse to agree a Peace Treaty to end the war but the Armistice ended all but border flare ups and varying tension. Even today, North Korea is still technically at war. Perhaps it is the undefined nature of the ‘peace’ that discouraged more attention. There have also been many more surrogate wars through the period of the Cold War and a new period of tension is now increasing only 30 years after the fall of the Soviet Union. A miscalculation may yet trigger a major hot war between the old Cold War participants, but a new form of Cold War is more likely, making study of the Korean War that much more important.

The author presents the memories of those who fought from 1950 to 1953. This provides a graphic account of all of the aspects of the war.