Escaping Has Ceased To Be A Sport, a Soldier’s Memoir of Captivity and Escape in Italy and Germany

This memoir is most welcome, casting fresh light on the lives of POWs. The title is very appropriate to the story but for many POWs escaping was always a sport that upset the captors and relieved the monotony of camp life. – Most Highly Recommended

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NAME: Escaping Has Ceased To Be A Sport, a Soldier's Memoir of Captivity and 
Escape in Italy and Germany
FILE: R2763
AUTHOR: Frank Unwin MBE
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back 
PAGES: 246
PRICE: £25.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: World War 2, World War II, Second World War, WWII, Italy, Germany, 
POW, camps, escapes, recapture

ISBN: 1-52671-493-0

IMAGE: B2763.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/y7qnxovz
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION:  This memoir is most welcome, casting fresh light on the lives 
of POWs.  The title is very appropriate to the story but for many POWs escaping 
was always a sport that upset the captors and relieved the monotony of camp life. -  
Most Highly Recommended

The war in North Africa saw forces advancing across great distances and then being driven back. During 
the process, large numbers of prisoners were taken. For the British, Tobruk was a bright point that held 
on as British forces retreated and welcomed them back at the next advance. When it fell it came as a 
surprise, a shock both to the troops affected, and the people at home. The surprise, now looking back, is
 that Tobruk ever held on. It was not a question of bravery, but logistics and the magnificent RN effort to 
keep this outpost supplied was inspirational. The process was helped by the fact that Italian and German 
forces advancing in the next phase of the conflict could ill-afford the time and resources to adequately 
besiege Tobruk. They were already running perilously short of fuel, food and spares, as they dashed a
long the North African coast. Every commander in that theatre knew that the priority must be the prizes 
at each end of the advances. Tobruk was a very inconvenient irritation for the Axis and not much more 
than a morale booster for the British.

The author tells of his views and experiences at and after the fall of Tobruk. He provides a graphic 
picture of life in Italian POW camps, his efforts to learn Italian and his first efforts at escaping. He talks 
of gratitude and feeling for the bravery of Italians who helped him  at great danger to themselves during 
his second attempt when he was free for five months, his first attempt ending after a week. During his 
second escape, he developed a lifelong love of the Italy and the Tuscan people.

Recaptured, as he attempted to find a way through the German lines to rejoin the Allied lines, he was 
sent to a labour camp in Germany. This was hard living in a quarry. Escape was not a viable option and 
he concentrated on contributing as little as possible the enemy from his forced labour. Then as the war 
came to an end, he was part of 'The Long March', walking for several weeks before being released by 
American troops.

This is a very nicely written memoir with a very interesting photo plate section taking the story through 
and on to 2008. In its telling, it offers several unique insights and adds to the picture of life for POWs 
in Italy and Germany and of their joy to return eventually to their homes.