El Alamein 1942, Turning Point in the Desert

Churchill described El Alamein as ‘not the beginning of the end but perhaps the end of the beginning’, an important point in the war, but with so much more to be accomplished. A relatively modest photo-plate section has avoided the most used images of other books to support a well-researched and nicely presented review of this critical battle of WWII – Very Highly recommended.


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NAME: El Alamein 1942, Turning Point in the Desert
FILE: R2623
AUTHOR: Richard Doherty
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING:hard back
PAGES:  257
PRICE: £25.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, World War II, World War 2, Second World War, Afrika 
Corps, 8th Army, desert warfare, logistics, anticipation, tactics, 
armour, artillery

ISBN: 1-52670-079-4

IMAGE: B2623.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/y8e5uowu
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: Churchill described El Alamein as 'not the beginning 
of the end but perhaps the end of the beginning', an important point 
in the war, but with so much more to be accomplished. A relatively 
modest photo-plate section has avoided the most used images of 
other books to support a well-researched and nicely presented 
review of this critical battle of WWII  – Very Highly recommended.

The author has provided an original view of the battle and the 
events leading into it. He has described the risks to the Allies 
and the potential for disaster. He has also described the risks 
facing Rommel. This makes into a fascinating and fresh account of 
what may be the most important land battle of WWII.

Certainly, the British and Commonwealth troops had been driven back 
in what was close to a rout. This risked the very real possibility 
of the Germans reaching Cairo and then expanding out through the 
Middle East, separating India from Britain and producing a pincer 
movement to join up with the Japanese troops advancing through Burma 
to threaten India. However, the situation was not as stark as some 
assumed at the time. Malta was not only continuing to hold out 
against the Italian and German air attacks, but sending out 
submarines and fast patrol boats to attack the essential convoys 
carrying supplies to the German Afrika Corps from Italy. They were 
assisted very ably by a steadily increasing force of attack aircraft, 
including torpedo bombers.

As Rommel advanced on Egypt, his supply lines were already becoming 
dangerously stretched, repeating the story of previous advances and 
retreats by both sides. To this inevitable consequence of a rapid 
advance along a narrow front, the attacks from Malta on his convoys 
from Italy was resulting in diminishing supplies of food, fuel and 
ammunition. Even desperate attempts by the Luftwaffe to create an 
air bridge with large gliders and powered gliders were unable to 
make up for the marine convoys and, in turn, faced attack by 
aircraft from Malta.

Although many have blamed defeat for Rommel at El Alamein on the 
logistics nightmare, there were two other significant factors that 
carried greater weight. Rommel initially won by surprise attacks, 
notably by heading south and coming around the Allied flanks. That 
tactic was now understood by the British commanders and allowed his 
intended thrust to finally reach Cairo to be repulsed. This then left 
him open to massive counter attack by Allied forces that had been 
resupplied and re-equipped.

The author has brought the work to life with the inclusion of direct 
personal accounts from those who were there. Great read.