Dying For The Truth, The Concise History Of Frontline War Reporting

The author has provided accounts from his own experiences of recent conflicts. The writing style has a light touch, with many photographic examples of his work. The war correspondent has long been a feature of warfare, but the introduction of photography, during the American Civil War, revolutionised the work of the military journalist. A readable and very informative work.


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NAME: Dying For The Truth, The Concise History Of Frontline War 
Reporting
FILE: R2453
AUTHOR:  Paul Moorcraft
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back 
PAGES:  358
PRICE: £25.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: war reporting, war reporter, war photographer, war zone, 
embedded journalist, conflict, military journalist, news from the 
front
ISBN: 1-47387-915-9
IMAGE: B2453.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/hb24ynl
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: The author has provided accounts from his own 
experiences of recent conflicts. The writing style has a light touch, 
with many photographic examples of his work.  The war correspondent 
has long been a feature of warfare, but the introduction of 
photography, during the American Civil War, revolutionised the work 
of the military journalist. A readable and very informative work.

The modern war correspondent has evolved into a writer and 
photographer, producing rapid flows of information, often in real-
time. The author has used his own experiences and those of others to 
provide a concise, yet comprehensive, view of the journalist's work 
in modern conflicts, giving examples from Korea, Falklands, Balkans, 
Iraq, and Afghanistan. Korea provides an example of a conventional 
war where both sides are equipped to meet on the field of battle in 
a manner common through the history of wars between nations. The 
Falklands provides an example that could have come from the rich 
history of the Royal Navy in mounting an assault a long way from the 
nearest friendly base and taking the enemy by surprise, achieving 
victory  through superior feat of arms. The other conflicts have to 
a greater or lesser extent been examples of asymmetric warfare.

The technical development of cameras has provided the combat 
photographer with a highly reliable device that can be carried easily 
into the battle zone with an ability to capture at long and short 
range the images of war. The movie camera has developed as rapidly 
as the stills camera and is now a very compact device. This enables 
the photographer to get close to the action and keep up with it. The 
move from film to digital storage has further assisted the work and 
is able to integrate closely with satellite communications, delivering 
the images to a distant news desk or studio as the action takes place. 
This also presents challenges for the military who no longer have 
effective control over the journalists operating with them. The trend 
to embedding journalists with the fighting units is one way of 
improving control and of providing their journalists with amazing new 
opportunities.

Even responsible journalists can release information that helps the 
enemy and irresponsible journalists can place soldiers at risk. One 
example was where US Navy SEALs made a stealthy approach to a beach, 
only to emerge into the blinding floodlights of the media. Finding 
effective answers to these challenges is not easy.

One of the surprising aspects of combat journalism is that most 
journalists are relatively unknown to those who eagerly read and 
watch their work. The author has gone a long way to correcting this 
and provided a frank picture for the reader.