Double Agent Celery, MI5’s Crooked Hero

Spy stories, fiction and non-fiction, are enduringly popular. This story of a British agent during WWII will be no exception, with all the elements to keep the reader turning pages to the end – Highly Recommended.


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NAME: Double Agent Celery, MI5's Crooked Hero
FILE: R2674
AUTHOR: Carolinda Witt
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back
PAGES:  271
PRICE: £25.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, World War Two, Second World War, World War 2, 
espionage, counter-espionage, Abwehr, GESTAPO, double agent, 
triple agent, turning German agents

ISBN: 1-52671-614-3

IMAGE: B2674.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/y728uuwa
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: Spy stories, fiction and non-fiction, are enduringly 
popular. This story of a British agent during WWII will be no 
exception, with all the elements to keep the reader turning pages 
to the end – Highly Recommended.

British intelligence during WWII was highly successful, but 
confusingly complex. The 'established' organizations, MI5 and MI6 
were joined by new and unorthodox operations, such as SOE. Some 
events were never fully recorded and of those that were, papers 
went missing or disappeared into sealed archives. Those involved 
were prepared to keep their secrets and much of what has emerged has 
come in recent years as classified documents have become available 
in public archives after being de-classified as time-expred secrets.

The author is the granddaughter of agent 'Celery' and has produced 
an absorbing story of 'Celery' that lifts corners on a grey and 
murky world.

One of the difficulties of the intelligence world is that rarely 
is anything black and white and the game being played can have many 
surprising aspects. Little is what it seems and the story of 'Celery' 
displays some of these traits. It is also a fertile area for 
conspiracy theory. 'Celery' was intended to be a double agent, but 
some may suspect that he was a triple agent, whatever proofs are 
offered to the contrary. Perhaps this is part of the fascination 
and enthusiasm  for histories and fictions about spies.

Celery was sent to infiltrate German intelligence, send back their 
secrets to Britain and plant misinformation that had been created 
by British intelligence to mislead and destabilize the Germans. 
However, the Germans already knew what he was and when he was 
coming, but they let him escape. To some, this suggests they had 
turned him into a triple agent and sent him back to Britain to work 
for them. Although this is a credible theory, it does not allow for 
the ingenuity of Admiral Canaris who led the Abwehr.

Canaris was a German patriot and a cunning head of military 
intelligence, but he supported Germany and not the Nazis, being 
suspected by the SS-SDP from early in the war and eventually 
arrested and killed. Canaris certainly maintained back channel 
communication to British intelligence and there is evidence that 
he was closely associated with known dissidents including General 
Beck and the other leaders of Operation Valkyrie that planed to kill 
Hitler and negotiate a peace with the Western Allies. It would have 
been within his known behaviour to allow Celery to return and act as 
a new back channel, even to the point of having Ab Wehr agents 
switch sides as new double agents turned by Celery and working for 
the British in support of his interests to achieve a negotiated 
peace.

As Celery was a known crook, conspiracy theory is given fertile 
ground.

Against that, this book presents information and draws conclusions 
with apparent honesty, all the more commendable seeing that the 
author is Celery's granddaughter. Readers must draw their own 
conclusions but, whatever they conclude, they will find this a most 
enjoyable, absorbing and exciting story that is told well and 
supported by some very interesting images in the photo-plate section.