Defeat of the Zeppelins, Zeppelin Raids and Anti-Airship Operations 1916-18

The German Army and Navy had been working on airships in various forms but the most famous were to be the Zeppelins built for the German Navy and deployed on terror bombing. The author has presented a review of the use of Zeppelins on terror bombing raids over Britain and the technical and tactical war of air defence and aerial bombing – Much Recommended

http://reviews.firetrench.com

http://adn.firetrench.com

http://bgn.firetrench.com

http://nthn.firetrench.com

NAME: Defeat of the Zeppelins, Zeppelin Raids and Anti-Airship Operations 1916-18
FILE: R2746
AUTHOR: Mick Powis
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword 
BINDING: hard back 
PAGES: 284
PRICE: £25.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWI, World War I, World War 1, World War One, the Great War, air war, 
bombing, tactical bombing, strategic bombing, terror bombing, airships, lighter-than-
air vehicles, navigation, air defence, fighters, technology, tactics, civilian morale, 
radio, aircraft carriers

ISBN: 1-52670-249-5

IMAGE: B2746.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/y8a95e3a
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION:  The German Army and Navy had been working on airships in 
various forms but the most famous were to be the Zeppelins built for the German 
Navy and deployed on terror bombing.  The author has presented a review of the 
use of Zeppelins on terror bombing raids over Britain and the technical and tactical 
war of air defence and aerial bombing -  Much Recommended

The Zeppelin terror raids were intended to break the will of British civilians and cause 
damage. The Royal Navy had spent much of its pre-war intelligence budget on 
tracking Zeppelin development, so that no one could claim that this new form of 
warfare against civilians was unexpected. The initial problem was simple technology.

Airships had received much attention because they offered an ability to carry a 
worthwhile payload at a time when heavier-than-air vehicles were very frail and 
limited to little more than carrying a pilot at some risk, with a low service ceiling, 
and limited endurance. Airships had already demonstrated a potential for long 
distance transport of passengers and cargo, including bombs. Mounting a defence 
against them was challenging although an RNAS pilot downed a Zeppelin over 
Belgium very early in the war. What was needed was a fleet of aircraft that could 
climb quickly to the height that Zeppelins operated at and be able to carry weapons 
that could bring down the large airships.

The progress in developing aircraft and weapons proceeded at a good rate and pilots 
began developing tactics that worked against airships. Those tactics and technology 
could also be employed with success against the heavier-than-air bombers that would 
follow the Zeppelins into German service.

To that improving capability, command and control was developed to get fighters up 
quickly to attack incoming bombers and all the emergency services were strengthened 
to deal with the consequences of those bombers that reached their targets.

The author has researched well and produce a very effective account of how the 
Zeppelins were countered. The clear text is supported by an excellent selection of 
images in a photo-plate section.