Cromwell’s Convicts, The Death March From Dunbar 1650

A rare and fascinating review of the Scottish campaign by Cromwell. The set battles of the English Civil War that saw Parliament triumphant and Cromwell placed in national command have been covered well by historians but little has been done to examine the Commonwealth campaigns. – Highly Recommended.

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NAME: Cromwell's Convicts, The Death March From Dunbar 1650 
FILE: R3116
AUTHOR: John Sadler, Rosie Serdiville
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword 
BINDING: hard back
PRICE: £19.99                                                               
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Cromwell, Civil War, Parliamentary Army, Levellers, Puritans, New 
Model Army, The Commonwealth, Scottish campaign, Covenanters, Battle of Dunbar, 
prisoners

ISBN: 1-52673-820-1

PAGES: 190
IMAGE: B3116.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/ullql6h
DESCRIPTION: A rare and fascinating review of the Scottish campaign by 
Cromwell. The set battles of the English Civil War that saw Parliament 
triumphant and Cromwell placed in national command have been covered well 
by historians but little has been done to examine the Commonwealth 
campaigns. –  Highly Recommended.

Cromwell emerged from rural obscurity during the English Civil War. He is credited 
with the establishment of the New Model Army and is remembered as a victorious 
Parliamentary Commander. What has not been covered very well is what happened 
later as Cromwell seized the reins and effectively became king in all but name.

The English Civil War was primarily a contest between King Charles I and the 
English Parliament, fought in a series of set battles across England with many sieges 
and skirmishes fought around the major battles. After the end of the Civil War and 
the execution of Charles I, Parliament was determined to bring a new order to all of 
the British Isles as a kingdom united and reborn as The Commonwealth.

In Scotland the Covenanters were determined to keep Scotland independent of the 
English Parliament because it had only been a Union of Crowns, where Scotland 
had retained its own Parliament and legal system. They stood at odds with England 
under Cromwell's leadership and, at the Battle of Dunbar, they lost. Cromwell took 
many prisoners and decided to march them south to Durham for trial and sentencing. 
Many died on the march South and many died in captivity, mostly from disease and 
malnutrition. The survivors were harshly treated, sentenced to hard labour, or exile 
as virtual slaves.

The authors have produced an illuminating account based on careful research and 
archaeological evidence.