Coming Down In The Drink, The Survival of Bomber ‘Goldfish’ John Brennan DFC

With the number of WWII veterans rapidly shrinking, this is another very welcome account based on the experiences of one who was there. The author has provided an absorbing story from interviews with John Brennan DFC. Highly Recommended.


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NAME: Coming Down In The Drink, The Survival of Bomber 'Goldfish' 
John Brennan DFC
FILE: R2480
AUTHOR: Sean Feast
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back 
PAGES:  190
PRICE: £19.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, World War Two, World War 2, Second World War, Bomber 
Command, Vickers Wellington, Liberator, Lancaster, SAR, North African 
Campaign 

ISBN: 1-47389-153-1

IMAGE: B2480.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/lotyzqo
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: With the number of WWII veterans rapidly shrinking, this 
is another very welcome account based on the experiences of one who 
was there. The author has provided an absorbing story from interviews 
with John Brennan DFC. Highly Recommended. 

This story is very welcome because it is based on interviews with the 
subject rather than an historical account from written records that 
then have to be interpreted. Soon, there will be no more books like 
this as the surviving veterans reach the end of their lives. There may 
be some books produced from discovered diaries but, even there, the 
author/editor will be unable to cross check with the diarist.

John Brennan was Irish and not obliged to fight for Britain. He chose 
to volunteer and gave good service as a wireless operator and air 
gunner, initially on Wellington bombers as an NCO. In due course, his 
dedicated service was rewarded with a commission and a DFC. He is one 
of the only surviving members of the 'Goldfish Club', having survived 
a crash into the sea. That in itself is a very interesting part of his 
service because it is a subject that has received surprisingly minor 
coverage in published accounts of the WWII air war. It is surprising 
because it was not an uncommon event. Many pilots and air crews on 
both sides had to make forced landings on the sea, or parachute into 
water, as they were unable to nurse their damaged aircraft all the way 
home. It kept Air Sea Rescue services flying boats, float planes and 
amphibians very busy along bomber routes and it also included fast 
rescue boats which were able to operate in conditions that prevented 
seaplanes from landing to rescue survivors.

Equally fascinating is the coverage of John Brennan's service during 
the North African Campaign, when bombers, torpedo boats, and gunboats 
made a huge contribution to the defeat of the Axis Forces in that 
theatre, providing one of the first indications that the German star 
was in decent and the Allies would eventually prove victorious. Again, 
this is a story that has been much under-told and this book goes some 
way to correcting the deficiency.

The text flows, the account exuded authenticity, the story is gripping, 
and the photo-plate section is interesting and supportive. A very good 
read.