Cold War 1945-1991, North Korean Onslaught, UN Stand At The Pusan Perimeter August-September 1950

This increasingly popular series provides a unique perspective on the Cold War, with this new addition to the series adding further depth. The invasion of South Korea by a dictatorship, supported by totalitarian regimes, naturally caught the democracies on the hop. This new book provides an account of what happened and how the US-led alliance fought back. – Highly Recommended


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NAME: Cold War 1945-1991, North Korean Onslaught, UN Stand At The Pusan 
Perimeter August-September 1950
FILE: R2821
AUTHOR: Gerry Van Tonder
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: soft back 
PAGES: 127
PRICE: £14.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Cold Warm surrogate war, Korean partition, UN warfare, allies, US, 
North Korea, South Korea, China, Soviet Union, Britain

ISBN: 1-52672-833-8

IMAGE: B2821.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/y2r4bkyw
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION:   This increasingly popular series provides a unique perspective 
on the Cold War, with this new addition to the series adding further depth. The 
invasion of South Korea by a dictatorship, supported by totalitarian regimes, 
naturally caught the democracies on the hop. This new book provides an account 
of what happened and how the US-led alliance fought back. -  Highly 
Recommended

The Korean War  started badly for South Korea and the US, as a Communist invader 
launched a blitz krieg assault. To the Communists, the South Korean State looked 
like an easy target in much the same way that Hitler and Japan had only recently 
thought of Europe and North America, only to find out the hard way that democracies 
may start soft but rapidly rise to the challenge of a new threat and win.

The US could have counter attacked with British support but took the more creative 
approach of invoking the newly created United Nations as an umbrella for a multi-
national alliance, fighting despots on behalf of the World. The Iraqi invasion of 
Kuwait was responded to in a similar manner, and was quickly successful, but the 
UN is much more a talking shop and unlikely to provide similar good service 
against future aggressors.

This new book is a first volume in the series on the Korean War and it is debatable 
if the Korean War has really ended. It will only be a certainty if North Korean 
disposes of its nuclear weapons program and enters into a completely new 
relationship with the rest of the World. The author presents a well-researched 
review of the opening stages in 1950. As is to be expected of books in this series, 
there are many images, mostly in black and white and photographic, that run 
through the body of the text.

In the opening moves, the North Korean forces swept South very quickly, sweeping 
aside South Korean and US troops. Victory looked to be assured but the US forces 
reformed and made a stand at the Pusan Perimeter, being steadily reinforced by 
troops, and warships standing offshore, under the UN banner. General Douglas 
MacArthur rallied his troops and withstood very heavy casualties in a successful 
holding of the strategically vital points along the Pusan Perimeter. 

The Allies were lucky that the Royal Navy and US Navy had not yet been run down 
after WWII and were able to send an impressive fleet of battleships, cruisers and 
aircraft carriers which were able to operate outside the reach of the North Koreans. 
Japan also became a concrete aircraft carrier and the war was to see a new situation 
where US warplanes were flown from Japan to target, leaving to waves from wives,
 children and girlfriends, fighting hard and returning a few hours later to a greeting 
from friends and families.