Cold War 1945-1991, British Army of the Rhine, The BAOR 1945-1993

The ‘Cold War Series’ is proving a very popular series and this new addition provides a welcome and rare view of BAOR from 1945. The author provides a very readable account of the BAOR from its start as a force of occupation to the end of the Cold War – Most Highly Recommended

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NAME: Cold War 1945-1991, British Army of the Rhine, The BAOR 1945-1993
FILE: R2754
AUTHOR: Paul Crystal
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword 
BINDING: soft back 
PAGES: 128
PRICE: £14.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: British Occupation Zone, German Partition, post-WWII, Cold War, 
Europe, Red Army, NW Germany, Rhineland, British Army

ISBN: 978-1-52672-853-2

IMAGE: B2754.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/ycab6wqq
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION:  The 'Cold War Series' is proving a very popular series and this 
new addition provides a welcome and rare view of BAOR from 1945.  The 
author provides a very readable account of the BAOR from its start as a force of 
occupation to the end of the Cold War -  Most Highly Recommended

In 1945, the Allies had decided to partition Germany to avoid a repeat of the post 
1918 situation where Germany again threatened Europe and the World. It was a 
period of Nazi hunting and organizing a conquered people. The first troops had 
spent up to five years fighting Germans, the German cities were 70% rubble and 
the Russians were determined to remove anything of value from their sector with 
widespread rape as an added perk for their soldiers. 

Conscription remained for Britain and the BAOR was soon receiving National 
Servicemen who had no experience of war or fighting Germans. At the same time, 
the first moves in the Cold War were starting. Nothing happened overnight across 
the area occupied by the BAOR. It was more of an evolution and was matched by 
the evolving changes in the relationship between West Germans and the Western 
Allies as a common foe brought them together.

The author has provided a very able dialogue of this process of change and the work 
is well illustrated. From occupiers with an understandable hatred of Germans, BAOR 
became a shield against Russian invasion and slowly evolved into military colleagues 
and guests in Germany. It was not all sweetness and light as the author has identified