Churchill and Tito, SOE, Bletchley Park and Supporting the Yugoslav Communists in World War II

This book is likely to be THE definitive account of the co-operation between Britain and the Yugoslav Communists. The author has researched carefully and provides fresh information and insights. – Much recommended.


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NAME: Churchill and Tito, SOE, Bletchley Park and Supporting the 
Yugoslav Communists in World War II
FILE: R2627
AUTHOR: Presenter Martin Mace
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword, frontline
BINDING:hard back
PAGES:  196
PRICE: £19.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, World War II, World War 2, Second World War, 
Mediterranean, Adriatic, Balkans, Yugoslavia, Tito, Josip Broz, 
partisans, SOE, Station X, Bletchley Park, intelligence, air drops

ISBN: 1-52670-496-X

IMAGE: B2627.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/ydz7q5ph
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: This book is likely to be THE definitive account of 
the co-operation between Britain and the Yugoslav Communists. The 
author has researched carefully and provides fresh information and 
insights.  – Much recommended.

Churchill and Tito were at first sight strange bedfellows. Britain 
could have been expected to support the monarchist resistance. 
Churchill took a more pragmatic approach and saw Tito as a much 
better bet than Mihailovic to fight the Germans in the Balkans. 
Churchill's decision was to prove inspired and created an 
environment that also stopped the Soviets sweeping to the Adriatic 
coast and down into Greece in 1945. Tito followed a unique path 
after WWII as a Communist Leader, refusing to become a Soviet 
province or satellite state to the USSR. He also managed to hold 
the disparate parts of Yugoslavia together until his death, when 
the tinder box again burst into flame. British support during WWII 
played an important part in enabling Tito to strike a unique course 
after WWII and he was to become the first Communist leader to make 
an Official Visit to Great Britain in 1953.

The war in the Adriatic and Eastern Mediterranean received little 
coverage at the time and not much more after the war, although it 
played crucial role in the opening Cold War and the current shape 
of the world. Far more resources were sent to Yugoslavia to support 
Tito than has been generally recognised.

It was not entirely harmonious because Tito had expected to be able 
to seize Trieste in return for his close working with Britain. The 
Allies were not prepared to let this happen and one reason was that 
there was continuing unease that Tito would eventually join with the 
Soviets and become a satellite under Stalin's tight control. Events 
proved that Churchill had made a good choice in this respect also 
and Tito resisted Russian demands to allow their troops into 
Yugoslavia as an occupation force in the final stages of the war. 
After 1945, Tito maintained firm control of the states making up 
Yugoslavia and followed an independent course in what he believed 
to be Yugoslavian interests. The level of his strength can be seen 
in the rapidly dissolving unity after his death, leading to bitter 
internal wars as Yugoslavia broke up. Although a dictator, he is 
fondly remembered by the people of former Yugoslavia in their new 
nationhoods.