Churchill and Stalin, Comrades-in-Arms During The Second World War

The definitive documentary on the relationship of Churchill and Stalin during WWII, produced by a team of three co-authors combining their specialist skills. The alliance between the Soviets and the Western Allies was a case of ‘my enemy’s enemy’. – Highly Recommended.

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NAME: Churchill and Stalin, Comrades-in-Arms During The Second World War
FILE: R3091
AUTHOR: Martin Folly, Geoffrey Roberts, Oleg Rzheshevsky
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back
PRICE: £25.00                                                               
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: World War II, WWII, World War Two, World War 2, Second World War, 
Eastern Front, Second Front, Arctic convoys, communism, Stalin, Soviet purges, Red 
Army, equipment loans, political tensions, Churchill, bombing campaign, invasion of 
Italy

ISBN: 1-781590-049-4

PAGES: 325
IMAGE: B3091.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/ucyydxl

DESCRIPTION: The definitive documentary on the relationship of Churchill and 
Stalin during WWII, produced by a team of three co-authors combining their 
specialist skills. The alliance between the Soviets and the Western Allies was a 
case of 'my enemy's enemy'. – Highly Recommended.

The Second World War was only possible through the 'non-aggression' pact between 
the German Nazi Government and the Soviets. The two regimes were in many 
respects similar totalitarian States. Of Hitler and Stalin there is little difference in their 
disregard of humanity, save the Soviet killing total was even worse than that achieved 
by the Germans. We now know that the Soviets murdered more than 20 million people 
and attempted to destroy the Polish Officer Corps by mass murder of all those Polish 
officers, who had fallen into their hands, when the Red Army invaded Eastern Poland 
under their agreement with Hitler to divide up Poland. It is easy to understand the 
attraction of a pact for Stalin and Hitler, neither of them intending to continue beyond 
the point where they thought they could destroy to the other.

The alliance of Churchill and Stalin was much more complex. They both saw each 
other as a natural ally for survival. Stalin deeply distrusted the British, to the point 
where their warning to him of imminent German invasion of the Soviet Union made 
Stalin consider it misinformation. Churchill was under no illusions about the 
communist regime but he was a historian, journalist, orator, pragmatist, war leader 
and politician. Churchill believed that he could do business with Stalin provided that 
he was always on his guard against Stalin's objectives diverging.

The authors have been able to include previously untranslated documents from 
Russian archives to compare with archives available from British and American 
responses. This has provided an impressive and absorbing composite of military and 
political history, documentary analysis and biography, in perspective with all the other 
critical wartime personalities. This documentary is supported by a fine selection of 
images in a photo-plate section.