Carthage’s Other Wars, Carthaginian Warfare Outside The ‘Punic Wars’ Against Rome

Historians have neglected the story of Carthage and its position as a Mediterranean Super Power, concentrating attention on the ‘Punic Wars’. Although the story of the ‘Punic Wars’ was important to the Romans, notably because they eventually won when Carthage failed to support its outstanding general Hannibal, it is just one small part of the rise and dominance of Carthage. – Most Highly Recommended.

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NAME: Carthage's Other Wars, Carthaginian Warfare Outside The 'Punic Wars' 
Against Rome
FILE: R3032
AUTHOR: Dexter Hoyos
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back
PRICE: £19.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Ancient History, Classical History, Phoenicia, Greece, Rome, Persia, 
Mediterranean, naval power, technology, culture, trade, North Africa, rich agriculture, 
super powers, mercantile power

ISBN: 1-78159-357-4

IMAGE: B3032.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/y29kt5nc
LINKS: 
DESCRIPTION: Historians have neglected the story of Carthage and its position as a 
Mediterranean Super Power, concentrating attention on the 'Punic Wars'. Although 
the story of the 'Punic Wars' was important to the Romans, notably because they
eventually won when Carthage failed to support its outstanding general 
Hannibal, it is just one small part of the rise and dominance of Carthage. – Most 
Highly Recommended.

The author has made a fine job of addressing the omissions of other historians. He 
provides a full length study of Carthage over half a Millennium, demonstrating how 
Carthage was the Mediterranean super power long before the rise of Rome.

Carthage was a rich and powerful trading nation. It was based on sea power, although 
it was often more successful on land. As Hannibal was to prove in his fight against 
Rome, Carthage could field more effective armies than the Romans and employ 
innovative tactics against them. However, the political power in Carthage was not 
always a reliable supporter of its generals and political intrigue was to eventually 
place Hannibal in a position where he could not conclusively defeat Rome. Over 
more than 500 years of history and achievement, this was not the only occasion 
when the politicians let down their generals.

The author has recounted the full history in an enjoyable narrative style with the 
support of a photo-plate section in full colour.