Cameras Combat and Courage, The Vietnam War By The Military’s Own Photographers

Since cameras went into combat during the American Civil War enormous amounts of film have been consigned to archives but remarkably little thought has gone into how that film was shot. The author provides a warts and all picture of life and experiences as a combat cameraman and also provides later review of those who survived into civilian life Most Highly Recommended

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NAME:    Cameras Combat and Courage, The Vietnam War By The Military's 
Own Photographers
FILE: R3228
AUTHOR: Dan Brooks
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back
PRICE: £25.00                                                              
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT:   Indo China, Domino Theory, propaganda, combat cameraman, 35mm 
film, 16mm film, SLR, Single Lens Reflex Camera, 35mm camera systems, 16mm 
movie film cameras, sound recording, embedded cameramen, fatalities, Vietnam War, 
column fighting, fire base, tropical rain forest, infiltration, drugs

ISBN: 1-52675-023-6

PAGES: 216
IMAGE: B3228.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/y4tkrp4y
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: Since cameras went into combat during the American Civil War 
enormous amounts of film have been consigned to archives but remarkably little 
thought has gone into how that film was shot.  The author provides a warts and all 
picture of life and experiences as a combat cameraman and also provides later 
review of those who survived into civilian life  Most Highly Recommended


The arrival of compact 35mm system cameras and compact 16mm movie cameras revolutionized combat photography. Before those inventions, the combat cameraman had all the odds against him and produced some amazing images for posterity. Glass plate cameras were heavy and fragile. Lenses available were limited and the dark room had to travel with the cameraman. It is surprising how many graphic images were taken, processed and preserved in archives to enable historians to find supportive images for new books. Roll film was the first major advance that enabled the cameraman to compose and set lighting and camera to take outstanding photographs. Even so, during WWI combat photography required great skill and even greater luck. WWII saw some major advances, with the Pacific campaigns being recorded almost entirely on full colour movie film with detailed single image shots usually still taken on b&w film stock.

The Vietnam War was to be one of the first conflicts to be recorded visually on movie film taken with compact turret cameras and for stills to be largely shot on 35mm roll film, using system cameras. The turret movie camera ensured that the cameraman could rotate to select the best focal length for the unfolding combat in front of him. The system camera offered a very wide choice of lenses to suit every occasion. As the cameras were relatively light weight and small, it became common practice to carry a number of camera bodies, more than one film type and a selection of lenses that could be swapped between camera bodies. This provided the means to capture images that would otherwise have been impossible. The film cassettes provided a much improved method of loading new film rapidly under fire and crawling through mud and foliage.

The author has provided a range of rare insights into the people who took photographs under fire, the conditions they operated in and importantly what happened to a number of them later in life. It is an enthralling story not to be missed.