British Warship Recognition, The Perkins Identification Albums, Volume V: Destroyers, Torpedo Boats and Coastal Forces, 1876-1939

This volume covers the work horses of the Royal Navy, from coastal vessels to blue water warships. – This is a reproduction of the set of eight volumes held by the British National Maritime Museum where it has provided an unparalleled source of information for the Museum’s staff – Most Highly Recommended.


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NAME: British Warship Recognition, The Perkins Identification Albums, Volume V: 
Destroyers, Torpedo Boats and Coastal Forces, 1876-1939
FILE: R2707
AUTHOR: Richard Perkins
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword, Seaforth
BINDING: hard back 
PAGES:  312
PRICE: £70.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Royal Navy, destroyers, torpedo boats, Coastal Forces, Motor Boats, 
MTB, MGB, petrol engined, steam, armoured

ISBN: 978-1-5267-1112-0

IMAGE: B2707.jpg
BUYNOW: htpp://tinyurl.com/yac6tmdf
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: This volume covers the work horses of the Royal Navy, from coastal 
vessels to blue water warships.  - This is a reproduction of the set of eight volumes 
held by the British National Maritime Museum where it has provided an 
unparalleled source of information for the Museum's staff  – Most Highly 
Recommended.

The author was a photographer of note who collected a unique photographic 
resource, in its field one of the most extensive in the world. He became the 
acknowledged expert in the identifying and dating of warship photographs and his 
project to provide a truly comprehensive recognition record of Royal Navy warships 
from the 1860s to the Second World War is a visual record that cannot be excelled.

Until Pen and Sword began a facsimile project with the National Maritime Museum, 
Perkins' work was not easily accessible to anyone beyond Museum staff and was a 
remarkable national treasure in its own right. By producing a full set of these 
recognition volumes in quality facsimile form as a large format book, the publishers 
have provided a commendable service to all enthusiasts, ship modellers, professionals, 
historians, and museums. Inevitably, a volume of this size and quality cannot be 
offered at a budget price, even though the publishers have set a very aggressive RRP. 
The reduction in lending library services in many countries will make that form of 
access difficult for many readers. Readers who might not normally stretch their 
budgets to this cover price may well make a special effort and find the money to 
acquire the full eight volume set as the only way to access the astonishing expertise 
displayed by Perkins in his fantastic work.

The Royal Navy before 1939 was seen as a Fleet of Battleships and Cruisers, the steel 
successors to the Line of Battle Ships and Frigates of the wooden sailing Navy. From 
1876, the new breeds of Torpedo Boats and Torpedo Boat Destroyers emerged, 
powered by steam or by petrol. From them developed the Destroyers and Coastal 
Forces vessels that were so important and numerous during WWI and then during 
WWII. The largest Fleet Destroyers were near to the size and power of Light Cruisers, 
with the smaller vessels succeeding the smaller frigates, brigs and schooners, the 
packets and gunboats of the sailing Navy. These vessels operated in groups and 
individually, as the workhorses of the Royal Navy, most likely to engage the enemy 
with frequency and closely.

As with all the sister volumes in this redoubtable recognition series, there are 
hundreds of the most beautifully delineated warship profile drawings , arranged by 
class and type, and reproduced in the original colours of Perkin's masters. This 
volume is again a treasure trove of information with not only a profile of each vessel 
included, but also providing analysis of the most minute differences between sister 
ships. In addition, the many detailed changes for individual vessels, during their 
periods of service, are included and the author has added a series of hand-written 
notes that are a welcome and important addition to the 
drawings.

This is a book that is very difficult to do full justice to in a book review, even by 
including many of the images in the review. Every reader of naval history and 
technology should make special effort to acquire or view each volume in the collection.