British Steam Military Connections, LNER Steam Locomotives & Tornado

A fascinating book that looks at LNER naming of locomotives and the military subjects they were named for. This is a fine production that does credit to the able text and the excellent images using quality gloss paper stock. – Highly Recommended.

http://reviews.firetrench.com

http://adn.firetrench.com

http://bgn.firetrench.com

http://nthn.firetrench.com

http://ftnews.firetrench.com

NAME: British Steam Military Connections, LNER Steam Locomotives & Tornado
FILE: R3058
AUTHOR: Keith Langston
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword Transport
BINDING: hard back
PRICE: £25.00                                                                
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWI, World War I, World War 1, First World War, The Great War, 1914-
1918, WWII, World War II, World War 2, World War Two, Second World War, 1939-
1945, Cold War, Gulf War, fighter aircraft, boats, RAF, Royal Navy, Locomotives, 
Steam Engines, railways, rail roads, Army, President Eisenhower

ISBN: 1-52675-982-9

IMAGE: B3058.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/utz8yxx
LINKS: 
DESCRIPTION: A fascinating book that looks at LNER naming of locomotives and 
the military subjects they were named for. This is a fine production that does credit 
to the able text and the excellent images using quality gloss paper stock. – Highly 
Recommended.

The subject of steam locomotives has attracted a large and growing number of 
enthusiasts, but it has also a very wide appeal to people who otherwise may have 
little interest in transport or rail technology. Even people who have never seen a 
steam locomotive, or traveled on a train hauled by steam, are attracted to the subject 
which is an almost unique phenomenon. Every year more and more steam 
locomotives are added to the number on display and working on railways, using 
private track, or now venturing onto the main lines. Initially, as steam died out on 
scheduled public train services, engines were acquired by enthusiasts who devoted 
hundreds of hours and hard work to restore them to their glory and display them. As 
with vintage aeroplanes, the larger the stock of restored machines, the more joined 
their ranks every year.

In any area of restoration of important artifacts, the first enthusiasts faced a major 
task because they had to learn how to restore and to replace defective components 
when the surviving stocks were rapidly running out. Increasingly, they had to learn 
how to make new parts. As this pool of relearned skills and specialists building parts 
no longer in stock or production, the more surviving relicts can be restored and the 
larger the number of people keen to see them perform and enjoy a method transport 
that has been succeeded by machines that do not have the same carisma. Inevitably, 
this increasing pool of resources and admirers set some to thinking of building full 
size working facsimilies of locomotives that no longer existed. It is an incredible story 
and the thirst for more information on this subject is never slaked.

LNER had a tradition of naming locomotives after military subjects and in some cases 
the name had a dual currency, as with the Army's Derby Class Motor Launches 
named after horse racing subjects and contributing those names to locomotives. The 
author has made a very good job of covering both the locomotives and the subjects 
they were named for and there are many stunning full colour photographs in support 
of very readable text.