British Naval Weapons of World War Two, Th John Lambert Collection, Volume 1: Destroyer Weapons

The author has produced a huge collection of the finest ships’ plans and drawings of weapons systems. This new book provide a unique collection of drawings of WWII British Destroyer weapons systems – Most Highly Recommended

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NAME: British Naval Weapons of World War Two, Th John Lambert Collection, 
Volume 1: Destroyer Weapons
FILE: R2840
AUTHOR: editor & introduction, Norman Friedman
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword, Seaforth Publishing
BINDING: hard back 
PAGES: 240
PRICE: £40.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Naval technology, weapons technology, guns, torpedoes, depth bombs, 
mines, destroyers,WWII, Second World War, World War 2, World War II, anti-
submarine, anti-aircraft, mine sweeping, convoy escort, fleet reconnaissance, 
shore bombardment

ISBN: 978-1-5267-4767-9

IMAGE: B2840.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/y3l73654
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION:   The author has produced a huge collection of the finest ships' 
plans and drawings of weapons systems. This new book  provide a unique 
collection of drawings of WWII British Destroyer weapons systems – 
Most Highly Recommended

There are almost 100 sheets of drawings, reproduced with all detailed views and 
annotation. The production is high quality as is to be expected of Seaforth 
Publications. All weapons from 4.7in guns downwards are detailed, together with 
torpedo tubes, gun directors and appropriate ancillary equipment. Every thing that 
model engineers and enthusiasts need to know about the weapons fitted to British 
destroyers during WWII.

The drawings are backed up with more than 50 photographs. The editor has provided 
an in-depth introduction to the procurement and development of the weapons. This 
is further enhanced by a selection of destroyer plans that show the typical dispositions 
of the armament.

Model makers, model engineers, enthusiasts and professionals will value this new 
book and regard it as an essential part of the naval history libraries. That it is the first 
of a series of volumes is even more welcome and it will form a natural companion to 
Perkin's British Warships Recognition, produced by the same publisher in 
conjunction with the British National Maritime Museum.

The price is aggressive for a volume of this quality and Seaforth Publishing will 
also offer discounts in the Pen and Sword promotional sales programme. Even so, 
it will deter some readers who would enjoy and benefit from the book. 
Unfortunately, the serious cull and reduction of public lending libraries will also 
leave some potential readers without access to copies. However, relatives and 
friends may rectify this at Christmas or birthdays.

This is a book to acquire at all costs.