British Destroyers & Frigates, The Second World War and After

This is a major study of British destroyers and smaller warships, first published in 2006, that remains unsurpassed. – This is impeccably researched book is very capably illustrated with photographs and drawings. It is offered at an incredibly aggressive price and is within reach of even the younger readers, but will remain a primary reference source for the topics covered – Highly Recommended.


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NAME: British Destroyers & Frigates, The Second World War and After
FILE: R2546
AUTHOR: Norman Friedman, ship plans by A D AakerIII
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword, Seaforth
BINDING: soft back 
PAGES:  352
PRICE: £25.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Royal Navy, destroyers, frigates, sloops, cruisers, 
construction techniques, warships, marine engineering, Second World 
War, 2nd World War, World War II, World War 2, World War Two, WWII, 
Cold War, exit from Empire

ISBN: 978-1-5267-0282-1

IMAGE: B2546.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/y83ua6rb
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: This is a major study of British destroyers and smaller 
warships, first published in 2006, that remains unsurpassed.  - This 
is impeccably researched book is very capably illustrated with 
photographs and drawings. It is offered at an incredibly aggressive 
price and is within reach of even the younger readers, but will 
remain a primary reference source for the topics covered  – Highly 
Recommended.

The Royal Navy had very long sea routes to protect from 1939, with 
far to few convoy escorts, a familiar problem that faced the Royal 
Navy in the wars that stretched back through history. This book is 
the most comprehensive design history yet of modern British surface 
escorts. It also shows the challenge that naval historians face 
with ship classes.

The first torpedo boat destroyers were littler larger and more 
powerful than the torpedo boats they were designed to counter. 
However, the class grew rapidly in size and potency during WWI, but 
the Tribal Class of 1936, although, by the standards of the day, one 
of the most powerful designs produced, are dwarfed by the latest 
Type 45 destroyer. What drove the expansion of capability was the 
early realization that destroyers could prove very effective convoy 
escorts. That also required many changes in equipment and armament, 
as destroyer escorts needed to be able to counter not only surface 
warships, but submarines and naval aviation.

After 1945, it became increasingly common for navies to commission 
very powerful warships under class descriptions previously used only 
for small warships. The Cold War destroyers became as heavy as many 
WWII cruisers, and infinitely more powerful. As the Cold War 
continued, the largest destroyers acquired a largely missile armament 
and a destruction power greater than many battleships which were 
being removed from service in most fleets and had already been 
supplanted as THE capital ship class by aircraft carriers.

For Great Britain, the last 75 years have presented great challenges 
for the Royal Navy. By 1945 the Royal Navy still had a powerful 
fleet that could challenge any other in direct combat, having a large 
number of aircraft carriers and aircraft, a significant battleship 
fleet, but also a very large surface fleet of destroyers and smaller 
warships. The designs were amongst the best in the world and the 
armament was amongst the most advanced. Against that, the country was 
broke after the enormous cost of funding its part in WWII, there were 
pressures for major change across the Empire, and the politicians who 
took over saw their main job as managing the decline of Great Britain 
and the disbandment of the Empire. The second National Socialist 
Government under Atlee additionally saw Stalin as their best friend, 
until his predatory actions were obviously to the most visually 
challenged British politicians. As the Cold War developed, the Royal 
Navy was increasingly seen by politicians as a North Atlantic escort 
force under RAF air protection and operating primarily in the North 
Atlantic, but then politicians are always poorly sighted with a very 
limited grasp of military threats.

During this period, the battleship was retired, the aircraft carrier 
force was decimated, and most effort went into building new convoy 
escorts. However, the destroyer was rapidly evolving and where radar 
had removed the need for catapult launched gunnery spotting aircraft 
for the larger warships, the helicopter was starting to make a new 
aviation role. It was able to operate from relatively small warships 
and could carry an increasing weapons load, with greater flexibility 
in targeting, and it could carry increasingly effective sensors, 
both sonar and radar. The result was that even small warships could 
carry at least one of the smaller naval helicopters and these 
helicopters could take on surface vessels and submarines at some 
distance for the parent warship. Larger warships came to have the 
capacity to more than one of the largest and most potent helicopters 
and the helicopter carrier was born, further muddying the waters in 
describing ship classes. The cruisers that were converted to 
helicopter carrier were clearly still cruisers in size and main gun 
armament and the Invincible helicopter carriers were described only 
as a ruse to fool the Wilson Healey Government which was trying 
further decimation of the Royal Navy in the mistaken belief that the 
RAF could do everything with a handful of aircraft.

Friedman has explained the policy and strategy changes that have 
driven decisions, the design and development of the warships and 
the naval policy applied to them