Britain’s Desert War In Egypt & Libya 1940-1942, ‘The End Of The Beginning’

A well-written review of the Desert War by a military educationalist, first published in 1964. This book provides the best available concise account of the Desert War, 1940-1942, and the publisher is to be commended for republishing now – Most Highly Recommended

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NAME: Britain's Desert War In Egypt & Libya 1940-1942, 'The End Of The 
Beginning'
FILE: R2948
AUTHOR: David Braddock MBE
PUBLISHER: Pen and Sword
BINDING: hard back
PAGES: 228
PRICE: £19.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: World War Two, World War 2, World War II, WWII, Second World 
War, military aviation, transport aircraft, armour, artillery, North Africa, 
Mediterranean, desert warfare, ground attack, close support, minefields, natural 
obstacles

ISBN: 1-52675-978-0

IMAGE: B2948.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/y5d6rgh5
LINKS: 
DESCRIPTION: A well-written review of the Desert War by a military 
educationalist, first published in 1964. This book provides the best available 
concise account of the Desert War, 1940-1942, and the publisher is to be
commended for republishing now –   Most Highly Recommended

Churchill was right to dub the North African victory 'the end of the beginning'. As 
with the Soviet victory at Stalingrad, the North African victory was the first point in 
the war when the Axis Forces were halted and finally defeated. From there, Allied 
victories started to roll in with increasing frequency as the Italians surrendered and 
the Germans were forced back onto their own soil for the final victories that would 
culminate in Unconditional Surrender.

The author received his MBE for 40 years of voluntary service supporting 
educational development in Dorset. Having served in the RAF as an Education 
Officer, he joined the University of Southampton's Adult Education Department 
and, before retiring, worked for the British Army, preparing officers for the Staff 
College entrance examination. The foreword to this new edition of his excellent 
North African Campaign history is written by a former pupil, General Sir Nick 
Carter KGB, CBE, DSO, the current Chief of the Defence Staff.

The very readable text is supported by many illustrations in the form of battle maps 
and a photo-plate section. Its an ideal starting point for anyone wishing to 
understand the reasons and progress of the war in North Africa and its significance 
within the history of WWII. It flows very nicely through a war that was a series of 
vehicle chases as the Axis and Allied armies chased each other up and down the 
coastal strip between Egypt and Algeria. Good generalship was of course very 
important, but the progress was largely driven by logistics and the effective use of 
armour, artillery and air power. It was also a war where the opponents managed to 
retain a level of respect for each other, even to the point of some encounters ending 
with the two opposing patrols helping each other out with fuel and water. It was in 
marked contrast to the Eastern Front where the Germans and Soviets fought each 
other with hatred and animal ferocity, giving and asking no quarter while inflicting 
terrible hardship on civilians caught up in the advances and retreats.