Britain in the Age of Arthur, a Military History

The author is a well known historian specializing in ancient and Medieval history with an impressive catalogue of books to his credit. In this new study, he attempts to find the elusive King Arthur through a study of the military of the period following the Fall of Rome. – Most Highly Recommended.

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NAME: Britain in the Age of Arthur, a Military History
FILE: R3155
AUTHOR: Ilkka Syvanne
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back
PRICE: £25.00                                                               
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT:  The Dark Age, myth, reality, military history, Romano Britons, Fall of 
Rome, Saxon invaders, raiding, cavalry, tactics, operations, warfare, equipment, 
strategy, structure, composition of armies, legend weapons

ISBN: 1-47389-520-0

PAGES: 278
IMAGE: B3155.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/qrsqapw
DESCRIPTION: The author is a well known historian specializing in ancient and 
Medieval history with an impressive catalogue of books to his credit. In this new 
study, he attempts to find the elusive King Arthur through a study of the military 
of the period following the Fall of Rome. – Most Highly Recommended.

The myths and legends of King Arthur are enduring, although there is little proof that 
the person existed. He could be the amalgam of stories of several figures who did 
exist, or it may be that the basics of the legends are largely factual. For many, he is 
pictured as a Medieval monarch ruling in England and establishing an order of 
chivalry in the form pictured by the Medieval French. We know that is not the reality 
only because the period in which he was romantically pictured was more convincingly 
recorded.

The period where he may have lived was the Dark Ages that followed the Fall of 
Rome. Suddenly the legions were recalled and Romano-Britons had to fend for 
themselves. Some had served in or with the Roman legions, particularly in the cavalry. 
They were trained in Roman tactics and weapons, familiar with the strongly built 
fortifications that the Romans had erected. As in the period before the Fall of Rome, 
the major threat to the English came from north of Hadrian's Wall. To respond to that 
threat, Romano-Britons hired Saxons to fight for them as mercenaries. They were 
paid in money and land and settled quickly into the English landscape. In that process 
they brought over their families and the stories of wealth and plenty began to spread 
in their homeland. From there the Saxons began to raid and invade, becoming a more 
serious threat than the Celts to the North.

The author presents the results of his research with convincing argument and 
delightful, informative illustrations in support. This is a story to enjoy. Many readers 
may not be convinced by some information but that might well be because the myth 
and legend of Arthur is so firmly rooted in the Middle Ages.