Best Foot Forward, The Autobiography of the RAF’s Other Legless Fighter Pilot

This book is a new edition of the autobiography originally published in 1957. The author was the second legless RAF fighter pilot after Douglas Bader – Strongly Recommended.


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NAME: Best Foot Forward, The Autobiography of the RAF's Other 
Legless Fighter Pilot
FILE: R2540
AUTHOR: Colin Hodgkinson
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword, Frontline
BINDING: hard back 
PAGES:  223
PRICE: £19.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: RAF, Fleet Air Arm, fighters, WWII, Second World War, 
World War II, World War 2, Spitfire, Meteor, Vampire, Korean War, 
Auxillary Air Force

ISBN: 1-47389-762-9

IMAGE: B2540.jpg6
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/yahc2w3j
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: This book is a new edition of the autobiography 
originally published in 1957. The author was the second legless RAF 
fighter pilot after Douglas Bader - Strongly Recommended.

Bader had lost his legs as a result of an accident whilst practising 
for an air display. Hodgkinson lost his legs in an accident while he 
was training with the Fleet Air Arm in 1939. The two were not alone. 
Many other pilots had lost limbs as a result of flying accidents 
since the earliest days of flight. Bader had a hard struggle to get 
back to flying and provided the precedent and inspiration for 
Hodgkinson.

Hodgkinson began a long and painful struggle. His right leg was 
amputated immediately, but attempts were made to save the left leg. 
It was several weeks before Hodgkinson asked the surgeons to remove 
the left leg which had been stubbornly refusing to heal. He also had 
facial injuries and trouble with the sight of one eye.

Only 19, Hodgkinson was determined to become a pilot once more and to 
fly Spitfires. With persistence and determination, aided by the 
precedent created by Bader, he joined the RAF and was accepted back 
into flying. He proved himself an effective fighter pilot many times 
until he was shot down and taken prisoner, being considered unfit for 
further duty and repatriated, but this was not the end of his flying. 
He not only returned to duty as a fighter pilot, but he went on to 
fly jet fighters until he left the RAF in 1946. That was still not 
the end of his flying because he joined the Auxillary Air Force in 
1947 and continued flying until 1952.

This is story of a brave and determined pilot who overcame serious 
injuries. It is moving and warming. It is great that the publisher 
has returned this gem of a book to print, and it will inspire future 
pilots. It is a story told with modesty and humour by the man himself 
and he has detailed the work of outstanding surgeons that enabled his 
recovery to fly again.