Battles of the Jacobite Rebellions, Killiecrankie to Culloden

A novel and rewarding approach in providing a comprehensive account of the Jacobite rebellions. This is a story of a family torn apart by religion and entitlement. – Highly Recommended.

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NAME: Battles of the Jacobite Rebellions, Killiecrankie to Culloden
FILE: R3100
AUTHOR: Jonathan Oates
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back
PRICE: £25.00                                                               
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Stuarts, Pretenders, Roman Catholics, Scotland, Ireland, insurrection, 
18th Century, Protestants, France, troops, strategy, tactics,  leadership, support, funding

ISBN: 1-52673-551-2

PAGES: 309
IMAGE: B3100.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/suzynoz

DESCRIPTION: A novel and rewarding approach in providing a comprehensive 
account of the Jacobite rebellions. This is a story of a family torn apart by religion 
and entitlement. – Highly Recommended.

When Charles II became King it seemed that the Stuarts had learned that support 
would come only to Monarchs that accepted constraints on their power in a Protestant 
country with a growing Parliamentary power. James I had faced his own difficulties 
but much was forgiven because he stood staunchly for Protestantism. Charles I was 
unable to accept a growing Parliamentary power and his confrontation led to civil war 
and execution. However, the rule of Cromwell, in all but title a self appointed King, 
caused increasing resentment even amongst those who had been keen to see Charles I 
removed. Charles II proved a charismatic Monarch who kept his own religious faith 
to himself until he was on his death bed. His adept management of the situation made 
him a generally loved King at a time when Britons were looking for stability and peace.

James II proved to be inept and succeeded in alienating Parliament and the people. He 
was forced to flee and was replaced by another Stuart and her Dutch husband, invited 
by Parliament to replace James. What then followed was as much a family feud as a 
conflict of principles and religion. James was determined to return as King but, in 
starting what became known as the Jacobite Rebellion, he proved he could win a 
battle but not a war and he began a conflict that was to last a half century, but achieve 
nothing for his branch of the Stuart family.

Through the period, France was the source of support for the Jacobites but not to the 
degree that made victory possible. Within Britain, support did not come from all 
Roman Catholics and the power base developed in Ireland and Scotland from those 
with very mixed motives. The Jacobites did present a real threat but lacked the 
consistency that a rebel force required to gain power. William and Mary formed a 
reliable team against the Jacobites and Anne was also able to command the support to 
keep the Jacobites at bay. The Hanoverians, George I and George II proved very 
effective and after some initial success, Bonnie Prince Charlie was comprehensively 
defeated and the ruthless suppression of his supporters finally brought the Jacobite 
threat to an end.

The author has told the story graphically with contemporary sources and archaeology 
to provide the first full account of all of the aspects of the fifty year conflict.