Battle of Britain Broadcaster, Charles Gardner, Radio Pioneer & WWII Pilot

The unique story of a radio broadcasting pioneer and war correspondent, told with affection by his son. This very original story has to be read, and widely, because it covers military history, broadcasting history, human interest, courage and service – Most Highly Recommended.

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NAME: Battle of Britain Broadcaster, Charles Gardner, Radio Pioneer & WWII Pilot
FILE: R3031
AUTHOR: Robert Gardner
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back
PRICE: £25.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, World War II, World War 2, Second World War, war 
correspondent, radio broadcast, pilot, newspaper journalist, aviation broadcaster, 
flying boat pilot

ISBN: 1-52674-687-5

IMAGE: B3031.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/y5pjg52t
LINKS: 
DESCRIPTION: The unique story of a radio broadcasting pioneer and war 
correspondent, told with affection by his son. This very original story has to be 
read, and widely, because it covers military history, broadcasting history, 
human interest, courage and service – Most Highly Recommended.

Charles Gardner chose to join a local newspaper as a cub reporter rather than to go 
to University and the World is all the richer for it. He served as a journalist with two 
East Midlands local newspapers and got the flying bug after taking a flying lesson to 
be reported in his local newspaper. He then went on to become one of two news 
correspondents for the BBC, the other being Richard Dimbelby. They covered a wide 
range of stories from the field, including shipwrecks, fires and floods. We take for 
granted today that even the most minor stories will be reported on TV and radio by 
broadcast journalists, but Gardner and Dimbleby were among the first of their kind in 
the world, pioneering the role, learning the hard way and changing the world. It was 
only natural that Charles Gardner would become one of the first BBC war 
correspondents and be posted to France with the Advanced Air Strike Force.

In France, Gardner was close to the action and sent back a stream of reports, 
interviewing many fighter pilots immediately on their return from combat. Safely 
back in Britain he wrote the first WWII book, on the AASF and became immortal 
for his reporting of an unsuccessful attack by the Luftwaffe on a coastal convoy 
before they were driven off by RAF fighters. This report will probably live for ever 
even though at the time some regarded it as a flippant 'sports' report. That however 
was the essence of its brilliance. The reporter was observing and enthusiastically 
linked with the action, using the language of young men of the period and providing 
via radio a graphic action that moved with the action at the pace of the action.

Later in 1940, he was commissioned into the RAF as a pilot flying Catalina flying 
boats protecting convoys bringing supplies and munition to Britain from North 
America. These were arduous patrols with the long endurance Catalina enabling 
patrols of 18 or 19 hours duration and sometimes even longer. After the North 
Atlantic he was posted to Ceylon as part of the reinforcement against the Japanese 
Navy where he was the first to sight the Japanese Fleet and report back its position.

Later, Lord Mountbatten, Supreme Allied Commander, recruited Gardner to report 
the exploits of the 14th Army in Burma. He broadcast and filed reports of their 
outstanding courage and achievement fighting the Japanese in the jungle.

After the war he resumed his broadcasting on aviation and was regarded as the voice 
of aviation at a time when Britain was achieving great success in innovating and 
introducing jet powered aviation that led the world.