Attila The Hun, Arch-Enemy of Rome

There are few individuals who have imprinted themselves as permanently on history as Attila the Hun, but although his name is widely remembered, remarkably few know anything about his achievements in detail and remarkably little has been written about him. The barbarian tribes had always been a thorn pricking the Roman Republic and the Roman Empire, but Attila presented a whole new level of threat as he scythed West through all who stood in his way. – Very Highly Recommended

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NAME: Attila The Hun, Arch-Enemy of Rome
FILE: R2825
AUTHOR: Steve R Dunn
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword

BINDING: hard back 
PAGES: 304
PRICE: £19.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Attila, Huns, Asian invasions, light horsemen, fast movement, mounted 
warfare, Roman decline, late Roman Empire, Roman withdrawal, vulnerable Rome

ISBN: 1-78159-009-5

IMAGE: B2825.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/y2l2vuml
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION:   There are few individuals who have imprinted themselves as 
permanently on history as Attila the Hun, but although his name is widely 
remembered, remarkably few know anything about his achievements in detail 
and remarkably little has been written about him. The barbarian tribes had 
always been a thorn pricking the Roman Republic and the Roman Empire, but 
Attila presented a whole new level of threat as he scythed West through all who 
stood in his way. - Very Highly Recommended

The history of Rome is of continuing expansion to the boundaries of the known 
world, with a triumph of the Legions over whoever stood in their way. There will 
be debate over why this expansion took place, and about how solid the Roman 
military successes were. Certainly, the Roman Legions invaded Britain and 
expanded North into the furthest corners of what is now Scotland. They built a 
fixed defensive line from the Clyde to the Forth but they also built roads and forts 
much further North, before deciding to retreat South the build a new defensive line 
that we know as Hadrian's Wall. Elsewhere, the Roman Legions advanced and then
held those positions, although there was continuing warfare with the Germanic tribes. 

It was only in the final years that the Roman Empire faltered and began to fragment, 
to live on into the Medieval period in its Eastern Empire, centred on Constantinople. 
There will be debate as to why the Roman Empire fell and why the rump in
Constantinople eventually fell. Some will make the claim that new vibrant nations 
and forces had developed that were stronger. Some will claim that Rome had become 
corrupt and decadent. Some will claim that the Empire had grown beyond the 
communications resources necessary to hold it together. Others will simply claim 
that it had no more worlds to conquer and that once any entity reaches the end of its 
expansion it can only stagnate and the collapse.

Then there are those who claim that the end of Rome was written by a new leader it 
could not stand against, and that leader was Attila the Hun.

The Huns were a nomadic horse people who ranged across Asia towards Europe over 
a period of time. They perfected the tactics of fast moving horsemen, armed to fight 
from the horse, and able to live off the land. They had no need for baggage trains and 
large urban collections of wealth. As a result, they could go where they chose, fight 
and withdraw to fight again, to avoid strong points and attack the soft targets of 
nations that had grown rich and soft. That of course is a gross oversimplification of 
the history of the Hun.

Attila led a people who had developed weapons, equipment and tactics well suited to 
fast moving attacks and were the inventors of the blitz krieg. They wore silk shirts 
that assisted the removal of arrows and they used recurved and asymmetric bows 
that were best suited to use from horseback. However, they did develop the skills to 
besiege strong fortified positions and they did deploy in large numbers, able to take 
on armies trained in the Roman manner.

The author has researched impeccably and produced a book which will be a suitable 
as a text book on the subject of Attila. It is written in an accessible style and is 
therefore suitable for any reader, including those developing a general interest in 
either, or both, the Fall of Rome or the domination by the Huns. The author has 
started with the background to the Huns, advanced through Attila and concluded 
with a presentation of the period following his time in history. The arguments are 
well presented and compelling. This is an important book that provides the history 
behind the myth and legend.