Assassinations Anthology

Assassination of War Leaders is as old as history. Taking the head of the enemy can be more productive than launching an invasion. The group of well-known writers have produced a series of accounts of assassination plans and execution, under a sympathetic editor – fascinating read – highly recommended.


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NAME: Assassinations Anthology
FILE: R2620
AUTHOR: Adrian Gilbert, Nigel West, Dan Mills, Peter G Tsouras, 
Andy Saunders, editor John Greham
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword, frontline
BINDING:hard back
PAGES:  188
PRICE: £19.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, World War II, World War 2, Second World War, Leaders, 
assassins, assassinations, killers, attempted assassinations,
decapitation of government

ISBN: 1-84832-697-1

IMAGE: B2620.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/ybjh5s9m
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: Assassination of War Leaders is as old as history. 
Taking the head of the enemy can be more productive than launching 
an invasion. The group of well-known writers have produced a 
series of accounts of assassination plans and execution, under a 
sympathetic editor – fascinating read – highly recommended.

The concept of assassination is ancient. In the days of warlords 
and kings, assassination was often a very effective way of 
changing the prospects of war. In those times, a leader usually 
had to fight to become leader and then fight to remain leader. If 
he was killed by an assassin working for an internal or external 
enemy, his death opened the way for the enemy to replace him or 
insert a proxy who would be loyal to them. In recent times, the 
outcome of a successful assassination is less assured, even in 
a totalitarian regime. Ne man or woman may stand out ahead of 
the government, but a replacement can be found quickly and may 
prove even more effective against an enemy. If Churchill had 
been killed the government would have continued. Even in Germany, 
the death of Hitler would not have produced German surrender. 
Many of those plotting against him shared very similar beliefs 
and national interests and, had the bomb plot succeeded in Prussia 
at the Wolf's Lair, the military officers forming the new regime 
might have tried a negotiated armistice but would probably have 
continued with a more effective defence against the Allies. Had 
an early plot succeeded it is even possible that the Germans could 
have fought back with more intelligent weapons priorities and tactics.

This book includes a fairly obvious selection of figures who might 
be eliminated profitably for an enemy, but they provide some interesting insights, good research and logical argument.