Arras Counter-Attack 1940

The author, a former soldier, has written 15 well-received books but is perhaps best known as a member of the innovative team at Battlefield History TV. This is the largely untold story of how two British tank regiments counter-attacked the invading Germans, helped secure the evacuation of more than 300,000 British and French troops from the Beaches of Dunkirk and made such an impression on Rommel that he thought he was being attacked by five Divisions . – Most Highly Recommended

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NAME: Arras Counter-Attack 1940
FILE: R2783
AUTHOR: Tim Saunders
PUBLISHER: Pen and Sword
BINDING: soft back 
PAGES: 204
PRICE: £12.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: British Army, WWII, World War 2, World War II, Second World 
War, BEF, German invasion, Dunkirk, armour

ISBN: 1-47388-912-X

IMAGE: B2783.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/y9bbfa9w
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION:  The author, a former soldier, has written 15 well-received 
books but is perhaps best known as a member of the innovative team at 
Battlefield History TV.  This is the largely untold story of how two British tank
regiments counter-attacked the invading Germans, helped secure the evacuation 
of more than 300,000 British and French troops from the Beaches of Dunkirk 
and made such an impression on Rommel that he thought he was being
 attacked by five Divisions . - Most Highly Recommended

Arras 1940 was a complex mix of triumph and failure, great courage and determination, an indictment
 of pre-war politicians who had neglected the British military, and a tantalizing glimpse of how the
sons of the Old Contemptibles showed steel to an arrogant enemy.

The author has told this story very well and supported it with a fine selection of images and maps. 
This is a story that deserves to be read because it, in many respects saved Britain, and made eventual 
German defeat inevitable. It also demonstrated what British soldiers could have achieved had they 
been adequately support by pre-war politicians.

The British Matilda tank could not be penetrated by German anti-tank rounds. This allowed the two 
tank regiments to carve their way into the German Panzers leading to large numbers of German troops
 trying to surrender. Had the British infantry been adequately equipped with personnel carriers they 
could have kept up with the tanks and accepted the surrender of German troops. As it was they 
struggled unsuccessfully to keep up and the consolidation of gains by the armour could not be completed.

The counter attack was still a great success strategically because it shook the Germans, caused Hitler to
 order the halting of the Panzer formations and allowed more troops to reach Dunkirk to be picked up 
in an outstanding evacuation under fire by the Royal Navy. That provided the British with enough 
soldiers to build an increasingly credible anti-invasion force around and unsettle the Germans 
sufficiently to convince them that no invasion could be carried out without first winning air and sea 
superiority. That hesitation allowed the RAF the time to complete preparations to prevent the loss of 
air superiority and to allow for the re-equipment of the British Army, replacing heavy equipment lost 
in France. It allowed the British Isles to become an unsinkable aircraft carrier off the coast of Europe 
and a jumping off point for the Liberation of Europe. All achieved on the efforts of two British tank 
regiments.