Allenby’s Gunners, Artillery in the Sinai & Palestine Campaign’s 1916-1918

This Australian perspective has been well-researched and provides a view of highly successful desert campaigns during WWI. Descriptive text is supported by interesting and rare images through the body of the book – Most Highly Recommended.


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NAME: Allenby's Gunners, Artillery in the Sinai & Palestine 
Campaign's 1916-1918
FILE: R2648
AUTHOR: David A Finlayson, Michael K Cecil
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back
PAGES:  376
PRICE: £30.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWI, World War 1, World War I, First World War, Great War, 
1914-1918, artillery,  armoured cars, light horse, mounted infantry, 
desert, Sinai, Palestine, Ottoman Empire, Arabs, war of movement

ISBN: 1-52671-465-5

IMAGE: B2648.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/yapw48g8
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: This Australian perspective has been well-researched 
and provides a view of highly successful desert campaigns during WWI. 
Descriptive text is supported by interesting and rare images through 
the body of the book – Most Highly Recommended.

WWI has received heavily biased military history coverage. The 
trench warfare of the Western Front and the battle of attrition in 
Gallipoli have hogged the limelight for land warfare and many 
historians seem most interested in claiming WWI as a badly executed 
conflict under incompetent Generals. The Middle East has receive 
some attention but mainly in the form of Lawrence and his Arab 
columns. Italy and Africa have received proportionately little 
coverage.

The highly successful campaigns in the Sinai and Palestine are very 
important, highly successful and deserving of much better coverage. 
This book looks at them through the prism of the artillery. A great 
story, told well and illustrated with some very rare images.

The campaigns in Sinai and Palestine were very much Commonwealth 
campaigns with a very strong Australian component. As a war of 
movement, armoured cars, light horse and mounted infantry were 
essential components, free to move quickly across large and 
inhospitable terrain. This required adequate quantities of light 
and medium field artillery, including Indian Army mountain guns, 
but it also required heavy artillery against towns and fixed defences.

Readers will find this a fascinating and absorbing study of an 
important, if neglected, part of WWI.