Air War Archive, Focke-Wulf Fw 190, The Early Years – Operations In The West , Rare Luftwaffe Photographs From Wartime Collections

The Air War Series is building into an impressive visual source of military information and this new addition to the series is no exception, covering the famous FW 190. The selection of images cover the early years of this versatile combat aircraft that excelled as a fighter and as a ground attack aircraft in Europe and on the Eastern Front. – Highly Recommended

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NAME: Air War Archive, Focke-Wulf Fw 190, The Early Years – Operations In 
The West , Rare Luftwaffe Photographs From Wartime Collections
FILE: R2836
AUTHOR: Chris Goss
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword, frontline Books
BINDING: soft back 
PAGES: 172
PRICE: £14.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: World War II, World War Two, World War 2, Second World War, dog 
fighting, air superiority, fighters, German Air Force, Luftwaffe, Kurt Tank,
ground attack, fighter bomber, hit-and-run light bomber

ISBN: 1-47389-956-7

IMAGE: B2836.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/y442mc7a
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION:   The Air War Series is building into an impressive visual 
source of military information and this new addition to the series is no 
exception, covering the famous FW 190. The selection of images cover the 
early years of this versatile combat aircraft that excelled as a fighter and as 
a ground attack aircraft in Europe and on the Eastern Front. - Highly 
Recommended

The FW 190 came as a surprise to the RAF when it appeared and decimated a 
Spitfire squadron. It was a significant step on from the Me 109 but it failed to 
replace that aircraft. Germany had made some fatal miscalculations that led to a 
war before the Nazis planned to be ready. In 1939, the Me 109, Me 110, and Ju87 
were still capable aircraft but needing upgraded versions. The main bomber fleet 
was similarly at a stage requiring enhancement and was totally unsuitable for a 
major strategic bombing campaign against serious resistance. All of the projections 
assumed that war could be avoided in Europe before 1944 and would be assisted 
by the further slow expansion of Germany by swallowing up neighbours of 
increasing size. This meant that much was gambled on leaping forward from the
aircraft, tanks, guns and ships of 1939 to dramatically more advanced equipment.

As the war progressed and the Allies increased their strategic bombing of Germany, 
while tightening the blockade of Germany and Occupied Europe, obsolete and 
obsolescent equipment continued in production beyond its real working life. 
Promising new designs were often delayed to avoid interruption of war production 
of proven equipment. When new machines did eventually arrive, they were usually
too late and too few. As the war progressed towards its end, even fuel and 
ammunition became problematic.

The FW 190 was one of the exceptions where a significant advance was achieved 
in a timely manner. On introduction, the aircraft outclassed all other fighters, 
including Luftwaffe fighters. The advantage was fairly short lived and the Spitfire 
was rapidly upgraded to achieve advantage over the Focke-Wulf. The Fw 190 did 
continue to be an effective aircraft, and was certainly one of the most important 
fighters of WWII, but it was adapted to ground attack and for hit and run raids on 
Britain where it was primarily a fast bomber with limited payload that could get 
through defences that defeated other Luftwaffe fighters and bombers.

The best years for the Fw-190 are those covered in this new book. There are some 
outstanding images that show the strengths and weaknesses well. There are good 
captions and extended captions in addition to concise text that introduces each part 
of the book.