Air War Archive, Dornier Do17, The Luftwaffe’s ‘Flying Pencil’ Rare Luftwaffe Photographs From Wartime Collections

The publisher has established a number of series of books featuring many rare photographs and these have become very popular with an expanding readership, beyond the original target of historians, professionals and military enthusiasts. This new addition to popular the Air War Archive series is a worthy addition with some excellent photographs that have not been published before in books available to the general public – Highly Recommended.


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NAME: Air War Archive, Dornier Do17, The Luftwaffe's 'Flying Pencil' 
Rare Luftwaffe Photographs From Wartime Collections
FILE: R2682
AUTHOR: Chris Goss
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword, frontline books
BINDING: soft back
PAGES:  136
PRICE: £14.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, World War Two, Second World War, World War 2, Luftwaffe, 
Flying Pencil, Do17, Dornier, medium bombers, army support bombing

ISBN: 1-84832-471-5

IMAGE: B2682.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/yanjol2k
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: The publisher has established a number of series of 
books featuring many rare photographs and these have become very 
popular with an expanding readership, beyond the original target 
of historians, professionals and military enthusiasts. This new 
addition to popular the Air War Archive series is a worthy addition 
with some excellent photographs that have not been published before 
in books available to the general public – Highly Recommended.

Following the established format, this book contains a wealth of 
illustration with original wartime b&w photographs from official 
and private archives. It is much more than a photo essay, 
containing a great deal of concise and well-written text that 
explains the strengths and weaknesses of the Do17.

This aircraft is yet another example of how the Nazis underestimated 
Britain and France which resulted in them fighting the war five 
years ahead of the Nazi planned date. Having started on a false 
set of expectations, the Germans then seriously under estimated 
the US and the power of the Commonwealth. That in turn resulted 
in the Luftwaffe starting war with obsolescent aircraft that then 
had to be kept in production because heavy bombing by Allied 
aircraft made it increasingly difficult to set up production 
facilities to build advanced designs in the numbers needed to 
stem the Allied advances on all battle fronts.

The Do17 was typical of the medium bombers produced by Britain and 
Germany in the mid 1930s. They were an enormous advance on the 
earlier biplane designs, but British fighter design and the British 
radar-based command and control network was advancing at a faster 
rate. The Do17 followed much the same layout as British Blenheims 
and Hampdens with the crew based close together and a totally 
inadequate defensive armament. This meant that for Do17s in combat 
with Hurricanes and Spitfires in 1940, these medium bombers were 
rarely able to lay more than a single rifle calibre machine-gun by 
hand with iron sights on the fighter, while the fighter was able 
to concentrate eight machine guns on the bomber using a reflex 
sight that made pilot and gun platform one integrated system.

Do17s performed well in Poland in an environment where the 
Luftwaffe held air superiority. Their performance was less 
impressive in France where the handful of RAF Hurricanes mauled 
them, even without a radar command and control system. In the 
Battle of Britain, all German bombers suffered badly against an 
integrated command and control system that could place the best 
fighters in position to make the most effective use of their guns. 
The Do17 was simply outclassed in that environment but continued to 
be used because the Luftwaffe lacked credible alternatives.

The aircraft soldiered on and a night fighter variant was employed 
as a stop-gap that served longer than expected. The basic design was 
also developed into new models because it was cheaper than completely 
replacing a very dated concept.

The book contains a comprehensive selection of images, many of Do17s 
shot down in the theatres in which it operated.