Agincour 1415, Field of Blood

Amongst a handful of battles that mark the rise of England into Britain and on to found the British Empire, Agincour stands out was a battle where a tired ragged army, significantly smaller than the fresh French Army, turned and fought and won magnificently. – Highly Recommended.


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NAME: Agincour 1415, Field of Blood
FILE: R2567
AUTHOR: B Renfrew
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: soft back
PAGES:  201
PRICE: £8.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: France, French Knights, English Army, English Knights, 
archers, Knights on foot, Knights on horseback, men-at-arms, camp 
followers

ISBN: 1-47389-488-3

IMAGE: B2567gjpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/ydx29jjy
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: Amongst a handful of battles that mark the rise of 
England into Britain and on to found the British Empire, Agincour 
stands out was a battle where a tired ragged army, significantly 
smaller than the fresh French Army, turned and fought and won 
magnificently.  -  Highly Recommended.

In the 15th Century, England was a small country of no particular 
wealth or account that was ruled by a Norman French king who still 
tried to cling to ancestral possessions in France. By comparison 
France was a mighty nation that looked down its long nose at little 
England, making a mistake that is still made today by some Europeans. 
King Henry took to France a small army in defence of his remaining 
French possessions. England could ill-afford the expense of this 
undertaking that was immense and costly in English terms, but 
pitifully small against the force France could deploy against it.

After a dispiriting campaign, the exhausted English survivors were 
demoralized and sickness was rife. Attempting to fight their way to 
the coast and ships for home, they appeared to have become trapped by 
a vast fresh French army, well-fed and well-equipped. Defeat seemed 
the likely outcome for the English.

What took place next was in one account a synopsis of all that is 
English and all that became British, to be repeated time after time 
through history.

King Henry gave his troops a short, simple, emotive speech that 
motivated his tired, sick army. He turned and advanced on the French 
host alone. Then a mighty roar came from the English ranks and, as 
one, they followed their King into battle. The English Knights fought 
on foot with the men-at-arms alongside them. The haughty French 
Knights stood separate from their common soldiers, mounted on great 
horses of war. The English archers caused carnage amongst the French.

Incredibly, the French Army was humbled and the tiny remnant of a 
small British army stood victorious. It became one of the great 
moments of English history. It was the cypher for all that was 
English and is now British.

The author has made good use of first hand accounts from commanders 
and soldiers on both sides, basing the story on chronicles of the 
times. Not a popular story in France but one that every Briton 
should read and know. Also a story that ignorant Europeans should 
read to avoid repeating the French mistake of not respecting Great 
Britain.