Against All Odds, Walter Tull, The Black Lieutenant

This is a fascinating, moving, inspiring story of an extraordinary man. This new book gives a warm and sympathetic biography of a man who really did achieve against all odds and was much liked by his comrades – Strongly Recommended.


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NAME: Against All Odds, Walter Tull, The Black Lieutenant
FILE: R2665
AUTHOR: Stephen Wynn
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back
PAGES:  128
PRICE: £16.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWI, World War One, First World War, World War 1, amateur 
footballer, professional footballer, 17th (Football) Battalion 
Middlesex Regiment, trench warfare, Western Front

ISBN: 1-52670-404-8

IMAGE: B2665.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/yc9242us
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: This is a fascinating, moving, inspiring story of an 
extraordinary man. This new book gives a warm and sympathetic 
biography of a man who really did achieve against all odds and was 
much liked by his comrades – Strongly Recommended.

Walter Tull and his brother ended up in a children's home in East 
London. Not the best start in life for anyone. Walter was to prove 
an exceptional man who was well-liked by all who met him. He 
demonstrated skill as a footballer, initially as an amateur and then 
as a professional playing for Tottenham Hotspur. Had the First World 
War not broken out, he might well have become an important and 
successful footballer. Certainly his performance at Tottenham, and 
then at Northampton Town, promised great things for a future in the 
sport.

Walter felt the need to serve and became a soldier. One of the 
aspects of the British Army in WWI was it encouraged the formation 
of units that grouped friends and neighbours together. Walter became 
a Private in the 17th (Football) Battalion of the Middlesex 
Regiment. In his case, the unit was primarily for footballers, but 
it was essentially based on the same concept as the 'Pals' Battalions 
where friends and neighbours joined together and formed a strong 
mutual bond.

Walter soon demonstrated his ability, rising rapidly to the rank of 
Sergeant. Along the way, he formed friends and was very well liked 
and respected by his comrades. His qualities earned the 
recommendation for a commission and he passed out as a 2nd Lieutenant 
in May 1917. He became the first black officer in the British Army, 
leading white soldiers into battle and was fondly regarded by the men 
who served under him. Sadly he died a hero in battle, leading an 
attack on a German defensive position in March 1918, one of the many 
fine young men who were lost to the war.

Inevitably his colour will be remarked on and it may well have 
presented barriers to be overcome, but Walter was regarded and 
remembered fondly as a leader, soldier and footballer, a friend and 
comrade who could be depended on.