A Battle of Britain Spitfire Squadron, The Men And Machines of 152 Squadron In The Summer of 1940

This is a definitive history of one RAF Spitfire Squadron during the Battle of Britain through the Summer of 1940. In taking a relatively short, but intensive, period in the history of a single fighter squadron the author has been able to offer a detailed perspective. – Highly Recommended

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NAME: A Battle of Britain Spitfire Squadron, The Men And Machines of 152 
Squadron In The Summer of 1940
FILE: R2790
AUTHOR: Danny Burt
PUBLISHER: frontline books, Pen and Sword
BINDING: hard back 
PAGES: 282
PRICE: £25.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: World War 2, Second World War, World War II, RAF, fighter, Spitfire, 
10 Group, Battle of Britain, air defence, squadron history 

ISBN: 1-47389-996-6

IMAGE: B2790.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/yawq9rdc
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION:  This is a definitive history of one RAF Spitfire Squadron 
during the Battle of Britain through the Summer of 1940.  In taking a 
relatively short, but intensive, period in the history of a single fighter squadron 
the author has been able to offer a detailed perspective. - Highly Recommended

The squadron formed briefly in the closing month of WWI and was disbanded in June 1919. This was 
the fate of many RAF squadron formations of the time as the war finally drew to a close and politicians 
rushed to spend the 'peace dividend'.  As war clouds loomed over Europe in 1939, the RAF prepared to 
re-activate squadrons and bring them to operational capability with minimum delay. In this process, 
152 Squadron (Hyderabad) formed in October 1939 and became operational in just four weeks. In 
January 1940 it converted to Spitfires. The aircraft factories were starting to turn out increasing numbers 
of aircraft with priority being given to Hurricanes and Spitfires for home defence.

After a period of defensive patrols in the North East, 152 moved to Warmwell in Dorset as part of 
10 Group, defending southern England and in particular the vital Portland Royal Navy base. It was 
very much a frontline squadron  in the greatest air battle ever fought.

The author has been able to convey the sense of frantic activity of a fighter squadron mounted on the 
elegant and formidable Spitfire. As a new approach to aircraft construction, the Spitfire was not easy 
to mass produce or to maintain during an intensive battle. Many pilots were to be very young with 
few flying hours when they joined their first squadron, often having less than 8 hours conversion 
training on the type they were now assigned to fly. There were also older and more experienced pilots, 
but attrition rates placed the young in the majority. 

During the Battle of Britain more German aircraft were to fall to the Hurricane. The traditional 
construction methods had enabled a higher delivery rate from the factories, making it much more 
numerous than the Spitfire, and it was also much easier to repair after withstanding sometimes heavy 
battle damage. During the Battle of Britain it could hold its own against the Me 109, but it was as a 
bomber killer that it excelled, a steady gun platform that was more than equal to German bombers. 
The Spitfire's higher performance made it very suitable to take on the German fighter escorts and 152, 
like other Spitfire squadrons, found itself pitched against Luftwaffe pilots that had already learned their 
trade in Spain, Poland, and France.

The author has been able to paint this picture and provide some fresh insight because of a narrower 
view than many histories that either cover a much longer squadron history than just one Summer, or 
attempt to cover several Battle of Britain Squadrons and Groups. However, the men and machines that 
are brought to life are typical of fighter squadrons of the time through the RAF fight for Britain, 
making this much more than a squadron history. A fascinating story.