British Warship Recognition, The Perkins Identification Albums, Volume III: Cruisers 1865-1939, Part 1

The Seaforth imprint of Pen & Sword has a well-deserved reputation for producing fine studies of naval technology and action. This new book is the third volume of the Perkins Identification Albums, Part one of the Cruiser album. The series is a quite unique production in conjunction with the British National Maritime Museum. A must for collectors, professionals and serious enthusiasts, most highly recommended


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NAME: British Warship Recognition, The Perkins Identification Albums, 
Volume III: Cruisers 1865-1939, Part 1
FILE: R2457
AUTHOR:  Richard Perkins
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword, Seaforth
BINDING: hard back 
PAGES:  192
PRICE: £60.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Warships, identification, waterline views, coloured drawings, 
cruisers, heavy frigates, pocket battleships, commerce cruisers, 
steam-powered, mixed power
ISBN: 978-1-4738-9145-6
IMAGE: B2457.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/hs5pvpc
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: The Seaforth imprint of Pen & Sword has a well-deserved 
reputation for producing fine studies of naval technology and action. 
This new book is the third volume of the Perkins Identification Albums, 
Part one of the Cruiser album.  The series is a quite unique production 
in conjunction with the British National Maritime Museum. A must for 
collectors, professional and serious enthusiasts, most highly 
recommended 

Perkins was a photographer and avid collector who produced a unique 
Identification series. A set of original albums is a valued part of 
the National Maritime Museum collection and this collaboration between 
publisher and Museum is resulting in a first class reproduction of the 
series of Albums. Inevitably, a hard backed, near A3-sized book is not 
cheap to produce. The publishers are to be commended for resisting the 
temptation to cut corners to reduce profitable purchase pricing. The 
result is a fine book that has a truly unique selection of images, 
reproduced to the highest standard and faithfully duplicating the 
colourization of the originals. However, the cover price is likely to 
be beyond the pocket of many readers who would love to own a full set 
of albums. The neglect of public lending libraries is also likely to 
deny access by those who cannot stretch to the cost of a full set. 
This is therefore first and foremost a collectors set and is likely 
to appreciate strongly in value. Hopefully, those collectors will also 
be naval enthusiasts and professionals who will make good use of this 
remarkable visual resource.

In this latest publication, Perkins turns his attention to one of the 
most valuable warship types. There has always been some controversy 
about the origins of the cruiser and its name. The most likely origin 
is from the heavy frigates in the days of sail that were built 
primarily as commerce cruisers and anti-piracy warships, frequently 
operating alone far from home port. Capable of being able to outrun 
any larger warship, they brought the weight of fire similar to that 
of the smaller line-of-battle-ship. This has led to some describing 
the early cruiser types as pocket battleships and the use of the 
description to apply to the heavy cruisers built by Germany in the 
1930s specifically to serve as commerce cruisers, with a long 
endurance provided by their use of diesel engines.

The Royal Navy naturally commissioned a large number of cruisers 
to protect the long British trade routes and to serve with the 
battle fleets as a reconnaissance screen. The smaller cruisers were 
to be little bigger than destroyers and armed with similar calibre 
main armament. They were intended to be fast and this is demonstrated 
by the number of funnels fitted to steam-powered cruisers. The heavy 
cruisers were armoured vessels, resembling a small battleship and 
armed with 6in or 8in main guns, later designs including catapults 
and aircraft for reconnaissance and gunnery direction.

This volume of Perkins Identification Albums provides a visual history 
of the development of the cruiser as an important and versatile 
warship type.