American Airline’s Secret War in China, Project Seven Alpha WWII.

b2404

This novel is based on true experiences and fits into a growing number 
of books and films where it might be accurate to regard them as 
dramatised histories. Its a great read and it covers one of the least 
known major efforts of WWII, the air bridge to supply China. Easy to 
see why the book received the Gold Medal Award of the Military Writers 
Society of America.

http://reviews.firetrench.com

http://adn.firetrenhc.com

http://nthn.firetrench.com

 

NAME: American Airline's Secret War in China, Project Seven Alpha WWII.
FILE: R2404
AUTHOR:  Leland Shanle
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: soft back 
PAGES:  244
PRICE: £14.99
GENRE: Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, World War 2, World War Two, Second World War, the 
'Hump', Asian theatre, China, Burma, Japanese advance towards India, 
air transport, air drops
ISBN: 1-47388-771-2
IMAGE: B2404.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/hj2rvgn
LINKS: Current Discount Offers http://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/sale 
DESCRIPTION: This novel is based on true experiences and fits into a 
growing number of books and films where it might be accurate to 
regard them as dramatised histories. Its a great read and it covers 
one of the least known major efforts of WWII, the air bridge to 
supply China. Easy to see why the book received the Gold Medal Award 
of the Military Writers Society of America.

 Much of the US support for China was indirect and/or covert. To 
avoid triggering war with Japan, the US supplied 'volunteers', 
aircraft, and supplies to form the Flying Tigers fighter force. When 
the Japanese forces swept through Indochina and up through Malaya and 
Burma, it seemed that there was a very real risk that they would 
advance through India and link up with the Germans and Italians.

Once the Japanese had attacked Pearl Harbour, full war between Japan 
and the US was underway and the US was brought into the Allied camp 
against Germany and Italy. The need for concealment of support for 
China then ceased, but the volunteer nature of the US efforts in the 
China-Burma region continued with regular troops gradually becoming 
predominant. However, the vital air bridge to China was to be run as 
a secret operation with WWI veterans and civil pilots staffing the 
collection of aircraft assembled to provide the bridge.

The author entertains and informs, providing a fitting tribute to the 
crews who flew 'The Hump'. The DC3 transports took a long supply 
route with medium range aircraft, flying very long hours and against 
the weather. A series of hops took the aircraft across the Pacific 
and Southern Asia to India. From the Assam Valley there, they flew on 
over the Himalayas, the highest mountains in the world, to bases in 
China. Outbound they carried ammunition, arms, food, and key personnel. 
On the return trip they brought out the wounded. For a time, the air 
bridge was to be the only link between the US and China. Eventually, 
the British Chindits took the action to the enemy and the process of 
forcing the Japanese back was to allow the highway from India through
Burma to re-open.

This is an epic tale