Warship 2013

B1835

This edition of the popular warship annual again features ten contributors, two of whom are new to the annual. The contributors are all well-established specialists in their individual fields and provide authoritative commentaries. Colour illustration is restricted to the dust cover which may seem dated for a serious 21st Century annual, but then many of the subjects covered were never shot in colour and it can be argued that monochrone illustration throughout provides continuity.

Reviews

Broadly Boats News

Broadly Guns

ASDNews

Nighthawk News

Firetrench Directory

NAME: Warship 2013
CLASSIFICATION: Book Reviews
FILE: R1835
DATE: 200613
AUTHOR: Edited by John Jordan
PUBLISHER: Conway, Anova
BINDING: hard back
PAGES: 208
PRICE: £40.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: warships, naval architecture, deployment, development, history, new additions, news, reviews, notes, designs, international, navies
ISBN: 978-1-84486-205-4
IMAGE: B1835.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/lh4dfhp
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: This edition of the popular warship annual again features ten contributors, two of whom are new to the annual. The contributors are all well-established specialists in their individual fields and provide authoritative commentaries. Colour illustration is restricted to the dust cover which may seem dated for a serious 21st Century annual, but then many of the subjects covered were never shot in colour and it can be argued that monochrone illustration throughout provides continuity.

This year, the annual again concludes with three general chapters. Warship Notes provides a review of naval activity and technology since the previous edition. A selection of Naval Books of the Year is not restricted to Conway titles and provides an interesting review. Warship Gallery covers HMS Pandora and the 1st Submarine Flotilla with photographs of the M and K Class large submarines that proved a development dead end and included a series of disasters. The Fleet Submarines of the K Class suffered from the surface steam propulsion system necessary to enable them to keep pace with the surface fleet. The M Class “battleship” submarines attempted to create big gun submarines with very limited success and the adaptation of M2 into an “aircraft carrier” submarine ended with the loss of the vessel.

The main body of the annual again includes incisive coverage of some of the lesser known aspects of naval history and will be welcomed by those with a serious interest in naval matters.

The first chapter examines the rebuilding of the Australian cruiser force, 1930-1940. The strategic thinking and procurement process are investigated thoroughly. This is an important process because of its impact on Australian capability during WWII.

The second chapter looks into the “Fourth Fleet Incident”, when the Japanese Fleet was hit in 1935 by a severe typhoon that caused extensive damage.

The third chapter considers the background to the building by the French of six apparently dated semi-dreadnought Danton Class battleships that formed the core of the French Mediterranean Fleet in 1914.

The fourth chapter provides a new perspective of the Battle of Dogger Bank. The journals of the Medical Officers aboard HMS Lion and Tiger are used to provide a view of treatment of battle casualties aboard major ships in WWI.

Next, OPV Designs are reviewed as part of the continuation of Conrad Waters design review of Offshore Patrol Vessels. This year, he examines the latest designs and the increasingly vital national economic marine interests.

The sixth chapter looks at the unlucky French destroyer Espingole. Phillipe Caresse has dived on the wreck and provides a tragic story.

The seventh chapter looks at the little known study by the Soviets 1918-1944 into the aircraft carrier. Various projects that were developed are examined in detail, including conversions and new-builds.

The eighth chapter investigates the attempts by British shipbuilders to win export orders from South American countries 1945-1975. This includes descriptions of successful designs.

The ninth chapter reviews the destruction and salvage of the French Fleet in Toulon in 1942 to prevent it being taken by the Germans. The attempt by the Italians to bring some of the vessels back into service is covered.

The tenth chapter covers the building of three Russian ironclads that were an important step by Russian shipbuilders. They were the first Russian vessels to include gun turrets and double bottoms.

Once again, the Conway Warship annual has produced some interesting investigations into a series of aspects of naval history and activity that has previously been inadequately covered.

Leave a Reply