U-Boat Commander Oskar Kusch, Anatomy of a Nazi-Era Betrayal and Judicial Murder

The story of Oskar Kusch is not easy reading and a rare glimpse into the realities of the U-Boat service in the Nazi State. Much of the coverage of the war at sea and life in the U-Boat Service have concentrated on top U-boat aces, the strategy of Donitz to arms race and decryption of German codes, but there was so much behind all of that and some of it was very dark. Very Highly Recommended.

NAME:  U-Boat Commander Oskar Kusch, Anatomy of a Nazi-Era Betrayal and 
Judicial Murder
FILE: R3315
AUTHOR: Eric C Rust
PUBLISHER: US Naval Institute Books
BINDING: hard back
PRICE: US$45.00                                                
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT:   WWII, war at sea, U-Boat Service, Oskar Kusch, Nazi era, U-Boats, 
submarine crews, attrition rates, German morale, Nazi fears, war prospects, military 
justice

ISBN: 0-1-9754-308-5

PAGES: 368
IMAGE: B3315.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/ype5cbm2
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: The story of Oskar Kusch is not easy reading and a rare glimpse 
into the realities of the U-Boat service in the Nazi State. Much of the coverage of the 
war at sea and life in the U-Boat Service have concentrated on top U-boat aces, the 
strategy of Donitz to arms race and decryption of German codes, but there was so 
much behind all of that and some of it was very dark.  Very Highly Recommended.

The basic tragedy for Oskar Kusch was that a captain with successful war cruises to his 
credit could be turned on by the people he served. The author has told this story but, in 
the process, provided a picture that is rarely seen, in recounting the life of Kusch and his 
officers, growing up in Nazi Germany and joining what was the elite arm of the German 
Navy as it was reaching its peak and about to start a downward track.

In the years before 1939, most Germans stood enthusiastically behind Hitler and his thugs. 
German was apparently recovering economically and becoming a force in the world. New 
roads and rail tracks were being built, workers could enjoy cruises and coastal holidays 
subsidized by the State and only good things could be seen ahead. There was a wobble in 
1939 as the shock of a new war with France and Britain became reality, but it did not last 
long as German forces swept across Europe, brushing aside all opposition. Hitler took a 
holiday in Paris and world domination seemed a probability. It was all too easy to ignored 
what was going on at home as people disappeared.

Some Germans did of course hate the Nazis from the beginning but they were very rare. 
Even when Hitler invaded the Soviet Union support did not waver because the German 
Army advanced with amazing speed, taking huge numbers of Soviet prisoners. Things 
only began to change as the set backs grew in number, for most the war seemed to stretch 
out into the distant future and the wiser people saw the growing possibility of defeat. It did 
not matter whether civilian, or uniformed, the first dissent was triggered and the Nazis 
began to see enemies everywhere. This led to the search for scape goats and individuals 
saw opportunities to denounce those they disliked. Once the wheels started turning, those 
caught up in the process stood no change of escape.

All of this can be seen in the story of Oskar Kusch. The author has told the story well and 
painted vivid pictures of German society, the military, U-Boat Service and the crews.