Reporting From The Front, War Reporters During The Great War

B2166

By the start of WWI, war reporters were present in some numbers. Stills photographers were almost as numerous, and the first war film cameramen were operating at the front. It was often a very dangerous job and casualties mounted. It provided a very broad coverage of action on land, sea and in the air. It began to change some of the practices of war and it produced huge amounts of material, some of which is only now being examined, 100 years after the events.

The descriptive and engaging text is strongly supported by a very interesting photo plate section. A very good book on a little-told story.

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NAME: Reporting From The Front, War Reporters During The Great War
DATE: 180315
FILE: R2166
AUTHOR: Brian Best
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword,
BINDING: hard back
PAGES: 193
PRICE: £19.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Mons, Ypres, 1914, BEF, WWI, The Great War, 1914-1918, The Old Contemptibles, The Contemptable Little Army, trench warfare, River Aisne, Ypres Salient, machine guns, cavalry, field guns, Gallipoli, journalists, war reporters, photographers
ISBN: 1-47382-117-7
IMAGE: B2166.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/n8huh3k
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: In any centenary year, publishers churn out books to commemorate the date. The outbreak of WWI in 1914 has been no exception. With few exceptions, this event has produced a fine selection of books and even where one campaign of one battle has been covered by several authors, each has offered fresh insight and provided a valuable additional book. This book fits into this situation. There is an irony that those who contributed so many inches of copy for newspapers and magazines received little coverage of their own important part in WWI

The War Reporter is a role that goes back far into ancient history. Until relatively recently, the role was not intended to produce a volume of information for ordinary people. Information might be highly restricted by design, but it was also constrained by levels of literacy.

By the 18th Century, the number of news-sheets increased and various publications, resembling a modern magazine, were becoming available at an affordable price, for the consumption of the growing society of literate individuals. Illustration was forming a growing part of the publications, but was in the form of cartoons and sketches, not always of great accuracy.

By the 19th Century, the camera was introducing a new dimension to reporting. Early cameras had a number of constraints and lent themselves more to posed static shots than action photography in the battle line. Newspapers were in widespread circulation and there were also many pamphlets and magazines that introduced more carefully considered articles.
By the start of WWI, war reporters were present in some numbers. Stills photographers were almost as numerous, and the first war film cameramen were operating at the front. It was often a very dangerous job and casualties mounted. It provided a very broad coverage of action on land, sea and in the air. It began to change some of the practices of war and it produced huge amounts of material, some of which is only now being examined, 100 years after the events.

The descriptive and engaging text is strongly supported by a very interesting photo plate section. A very good book on a little-told story.

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