Mister Browrigg’s Boys, Magdalen College School and the Great War

B2171

This book is a story of a system of education, of a society that it was set in but, above all, it is the story of fifty boys who lost their lives in terrible conflict that so scared a generation that it was considered the War to End All Wars, only to lead on to a second terrible conflict.

The text captures attention and the illustrations fully support the text. Each reader will take away something unique and be pleased to have devoted time to read the story.

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NAME: Mister Browrigg’s Boys, Magdalen College School and the Great War
DATE: 180315
FILE: R2171
AUTHOR: David Bebbington
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword,
BINDING: hard back
PAGES: 385
PRICE: £30.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWI, The Great War, 1914-1918, The Old Contemptibles, The Contemptable Little Army,
ISBN: 1-78346-299-X
IMAGE: B2171.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/krto7bw
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: This is a sad, moving, inspiring, and strange story. It is strange because it is outside the experiences of a 21st Century readership, but it was all too familiar to the boys of 1914-1918 and their families. Society has changed on so many levels since 1918.

The Britain of 1914 was a world of confidence. The Empire was at its height, British industry still led the world, it was difficult to think of anything that might be invented that had not already been achieved. Britain was a Christian society where most of the population went to worship on every Sunday. In the country, village life was still little changed over several hundred years. There was a level of permanence about virtually every aspect of life. In August 1914, all of that was to change for ever.

Magdalen College School was supreme in its field of education to its alma mater, but it was also typical of that type of educational establishment. Across the British Isles there were similar schools, with similar traditions, teaching the same subjects in a very similar way. The society within the school was similar. The school year unfolded in much the same way as it had for generations. It produced the soldiers and administrators of Empire. It held the same enthusiasm for the same sports that other similar schools held.

This book is a story of a system of education, of a society that it was set in but, above all, it is the story of fifty boys who lost their lives in terrible conflict that so scared a generation that it was considered the War to End All Wars, only to lead on to a second terrible conflict.

Any private school, that has existed since before 1914, now has two rolls enscrolled on its walls, usually gold lettering on darkened wood and always painfully longer than they should have been. They often sit with the rolls of honour that record the more pacific progress of the school, its head boys and its sports teams, trophies won and teachers who were highly regarded and now no more. In this Magdalen College School is little different, except for those who have passed through its portals and who will treasure this book and its claims for uniqueness. Perhaps it will inspire other authors to record as lovingly the schools at which they studied or taught.

The text captures attention and the illustrations fully support the text. Each reader will take away something unique and be pleased to have devoted time to read the story.

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