Marching From Defeat, Surviving The Collapse Of The German Army In The Soviet Union 1944

The personal account of a young artillery officer of the chaos of the final days of WWII on the Eastern Front and the struggle for survival. The author tells his personal story against a graphic picture of the final stages of WWII and the collapse of Army Group Centre. Very Highly Recommended

NAME:    Marching From Defeat, Surviving The Collapse Of The German Army In 
The Soviet Union 1944
FILE: R3264
AUTHOR: Claus Neuber
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back
PRICE: £19.99                                                          
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT:   WWII, World War II , World War 2, Second World War, Germany, Nazi 
Party, Wehrmacht, Luftwaffe, Kriegs Marine, SS, GESTAPO, Nazi officials, Soviet 
Union, Stalin, long captivity, Soviet POW camps, casual violence, hunger, medical 
care, comradeship, courage, determination, endurance

ISBN: 1-52670-426-9

PAGES: 191
IMAGE: B3264.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/y2ye6lxc
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: The personal account of a young artillery officer of the chaos of the 
final days of WWII on the Eastern Front and the struggle for survival.  The author 
tells his personal story against a graphic picture of the final stages of WWII and 
the collapse of Army Group Centre.   Very Highly Recommended


The war on the Eastern Front was unusually bitter and violent. On their way East, the Germans had treated the populations of the areas they advanced through with great brutality. It was not just a small number of SS death squads following Nazi policies to exterminate unwanted people. The Luftwaffe and the Wehrmacht were also involved in the massacres and war crimes. We may never know the full extent of the involvement of all elements of the Nazi war machine and the SS became a useful scapegoat for Germans and Western Allies. The scale of the brutality on the Eastern Front was unrivalled by any other battle fronts. Generally, on the Western Front, the atrocities were committed almost entirely by the SS, particularly in the shooting of prisoners.

Given the behaviour of Germans, as they advanced into the Soviet Union, it is very easy to understand that the Soviet forces felt no need to constrain themselves when it came to their turn to advance westward. Mass killings and brutal treatment of prisoners was the norm for both sides.

By 1944, the Red Army was clearly in command of the battlefields and it was only a matter of time before they smashed their way to Berlin. The author was one of the lucky ones, captured, he escaped. Of all of the German POWs only some 6% survived the Soviet camps and Stalin was in no hurry to let any of them go home. Those considered useful communists did make it home shortly after the hostilities ended but the mass did not and of those who did survive, many were not released until after Stalin’s death and pressure from Britain and the US.

This is an unforgettable personal account of the implosion of the German forces under the weight of the Red Army and reduced supplies as the British and USAAF bomber crews pounded Germany. It is a moving and harrowing account of escape and the hardship involved.